backtop


Print 21 comment(s) - last by xsilver.. on Apr 10 at 12:03 AM

Transcend brings SSDs to the ExpressCard form-factor

While most manufacturers are using the 1.8" or 2.5" mobile hard disk drive (HDD) form-factor for solid-state drives (SSDs), Transcend is going a different route with its latest offering. The company has displayed a USB 2.0-based ExpressCard SSD that is available in capacities up to 16GB.

The SSDs are Windows Vista ReadyBoost compatible, feature Error Correction Code (ECC) and wear-leveling algorithms to ensure data integrity. And thanks to the USB 2.0 interface, the SSD shows up as a regular USB flash drive in Windows.

Transcend is also bundling an ExpressCard to USB adapter with the drives for those that would like to use it externally or don't have an ExpressCard slot.

Transcend's ExpressCard SSD will be available in capacities of 2GB, 4GB, 8GB and 16GB. Pricing and availability have not been announced, but will surely follow later this month.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Might as well be external usb
By peternelson on 4/4/2007 10:44:20 AM , Rating: 2
Expresscard is a cool interface and supports BOTH PCI Express lane and usb.

I wish for a pcie card for my pc which can offer an expresscard slot on a desktop.

However, this product is not so great. They are only using the usb connectivity in the expresscard slot. Might as well just have cheaper device with a usb plug on.

USB is terrible for I/O because it imposes a high overhead in terms of cpu utilisation when being accessed heavily.

Thus the readyboost advantages will be somewhat offset by usb comms overhead causing slowdown.

So the only neat thing about this is it can sit inside the laptop not hang out.

Now, if they actually wrote drivers and used natively the pci express interface to connect that SSD memory I'd be REALLY impressed and REALLY interested. Unfortunately many people will think that is what this is, and be unfairly underimpressed by the expresscard interface.




RE: Might as well be external usb
By TomZ on 4/4/2007 3:05:44 PM , Rating: 2
I don't think you're right about the USB overhead - the USB host on the PC uses DMA to transfer to/from memory. Also, in practice, when reading to or writing to high-bandwidth devices, I don't see any significant CPU utilization due to that activity.


"Young lady, in this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics!" -- Homer Simpson

Related Articles
Samsung Announces 64GB Flash-SSD
March 27, 2007, 10:38 AM













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki