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Microsoft Windows OneCare Live launches in June for an annual fee of $49.95

Microsoft plans to jump in feet first with its first foray into the software antivirus market. The company's subscription-based Windows OneCare Live software will launch in June of this year

Over 20,000 beta testers have been putting the software through the ringer since November of last year. They have provided much needed input for the security suite which offers antivirus and spyware protection, an integrated firewall, backup utilities and performance tuning software.

Microsoft's established competitors aren't sitting idle while the Redmond-based company enters the a market which is expected to top $6 billion by 2008:

Last week, Symantec's CEO John Thompson said the company would make investments to fend off Microsoft and any other potential competitors.

Symantec, the world's biggest security software company, said it plans to offer its own all-in-one subscription-based software product code-named "Genesis" that it expects to introduce later this year.

Microsoft Windows OneCare Live will have a price tag of $49.95 annually for use on up to three machines.



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RE: Unethical?
By Nekrik on 2/8/2006 3:57:24 AM , Rating: 2
From my point of view I don't believe the're changing their security releases and patches for the OS to a pay service and calling it an AV app. They'll continue to run the Window's Update as it was before. One Care will included a simplified BU utility, a live AV scan for email and files, fixes to infected machines with this/that worm, etc... much the same as Norton offers.

I think more people are coming to the defense as they see MS taking steps to correct a lot of the problems they've had in the past, many which were the result of trying to allow too much freedom as that was what customers thought they wanted. Ten years ago 95% of the users would have said 'give me admin mode, passwords annoy me, I know what I'm doing' they now realize security is a pain in the ass.

As far as them hiding information or planting holes/bugs in the OS so they can fix them, I think that's a conspiracy theorey waiting to happen, but has no merrit. They have far more to lose by doing so than they could ever gain. As far as I know, they're not really hurting for funds.


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