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TI's pico-projector assembly promises to place mobile movie magic at your fingertips.
Downloading video onto a mobile phone could take on a whole new meaning with these pint-sized projectors.

Ask people why they don't watch video on their mobile phones and most will cite the small screen size as a major drawback. Texas Instruments hopes to solve the problem by letting mobile users project images from their wireless device onto a screen or a handy wall.

Making good on promises the chipmaker made earlier this year, TI used the CTIA Wireless 2007 show this week in Orlando to publicly demo its "pico-projector" prototype for the first time. A tiny version of its DLP image projection technology, the pico-projector is small enough to fit inside a cell phone. The device builds on TI's existing efforts in mobile projection technology, culminating in the 2006 introduction of DLP-based pocket projectors from Mitsubishi, Samsung, and Toshiba.

"Over the next few years, we envision a large opportunity for the convergence of projection technology and mobile devices, like cell phones," TI's Worldwide Strategic Marketing and Business Development Manager for DLP Front Projection Frank Moizio, said in a prepared statement.

Unlike existing DLP-based pocket projectors, which rely on an LED light source, CNET reports that the pico-projector device incorporates three lasers, along with a DLP chip and a power supply. Housed in a nonfunctioning cell phone for this demonstration, the projector itself measures about 1.5 inches in length. TI officials claim the device provides DVD-quality video, and the projection technology allows an effective screen size that far surpasses even the largest cell phone displays.

A variety of mobile devices could ultimately incorporate cell-sized projectors, including digital cameras and camcorders, as well as portable video players. TI has not announced availability or pricing for the pico-projector.





"Intel is investing heavily (think gazillions of dollars and bazillions of engineering man hours) in resources to create an Intel host controllers spec in order to speed time to market of the USB 3.0 technology." -- Intel blogger Nick Knupffer
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