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Saturn Aura Green Line
The Saturn Aura Green Line starts at $22,695 including destination charge

General Motors has officially announced pricing for its 2007 Saturn Aura Green Line hybrid sedan. The vehicle will retail for $22,695 including destination charge and will also be eligible for a $1,300 tax credit from the federal government for 2007 tax returns.

For comparison, the Honda Civic Hybrid, Nissan Altima Hybrid, Toyota Prius and Toyota Camry Hybrid are priced from $22,985, $25,015, $22,975 and $26,820 respectively, including destination charge.

The 2007 Aura Green Line is considered to be a "mild hybrid" since it cannot move forward under electric power alone. The Aura Green Line hybrid powertrain (164HP 2.4 liter 4-cylinder plus electric motor/generator) is capable of providing mild electric assistance under acceleration, stopping the engine when the vehicle comes to a stop and starting it back up again when the gas is pressed. The car also takes advantage of regenerative braking to help recharge the battery pack.

The Aura Green Line boasts EPA ratings of 28MPG/35MPG city/highway compared to 20/30 for an Aura with the 224HP 3.5 liter V6 and 20/28 for the Aura with the 252HP 3.6 liter V6.

A more viable comparison may be with the Pontiac G6 base sedan. This vehicle is the Saturn Aura's platform-mate and also uses the 2.4 liter 4-cylinder engine and transmission without the hybrid add-ons. EPA ratings for the G6 are 23/33 city/highway which means that the Aura Green Line’s hybrid system affords the driver an additional 5MPG in the city and 2MPG on the highway.



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RE: Underwhelming fuel economy
By Steele on 3/20/2007 3:52:46 PM , Rating: 2
Alrighty... Le tme start from the top.

Do you know that liquid stuff you put in the tank under your car? No, not the thick black gooey stuff, the clear liquid that looks like water... Yeah, that stuff. That is called "Gasoline" (unless you drive a diesel or something else, but since you don't understand "pollution," you won't know the difference anyway).

When you put gasoline in the "gas tank" of your car, you have "fueled it up." You are now ready to drive. When you start the motor, small amounts of gasoline are pulled from the tank into the motor itself by the "fuel pump." The gasoline is then sent to the cylinders of the car. These are the things that make noise and make the car "go."

Once the fuel has reached the cylinders, it is mixed with air, and a small spark ignites the fuel. Unfortunatly, life is not like Star Trek, so when the fuel burns, there are byproducts of this combustion.

These byproducts are exhausted from the engine and out the tailpipe of the vehicle. Among them, are Carbon Dioxide, theoretically one of the leading causes of global warming; Carbon Monoxide, which bonds with your blood cells and displaces oxygen, causing you to asphyxiate; water, which is usually harmless; and many other things. Those are the big ones, though.

You asked for proof that cars pollute. This is the best I can do. Frankly, if this isn't good enough, you're better off not driving a car.

Steele


RE: Underwhelming fuel economy
By hubajube on 3/20/2007 4:09:52 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
You asked for proof that cars pollute. This is the best I can do. Frankly, if this isn't good enough, you're better off not driving a car.
None of you have given any proof! LOL! Just rumor and speculation. Shit, I can do that! I'll show you.

There is no air pollution technically. Why? Because the earth's air is constantly being recycled. This recycling process removes any potential contaminants that are introduced. Therefore, there is no pollution, per se.

Now what makes what you said any different than what I just said. Without proof, there is no difference.


RE: Underwhelming fuel economy
By Keeir on 3/20/2007 5:25:09 PM , Rating: 2
mmm... maybe you should re-read the defination of pollute.

"
pol·lute (p-lt)
v. pol·lut·ed, pol·lut·ing, pol·lutes

To make unfit for or harmful to living things, especially by the addition of waste matter; contaminate.
To make less suitable for an activity, especially by the introduction of unwanted factors.
"

From the American Heritage Dictionary.

I would say that the combustion reaction of a Hydrocarbon plus Oxygen is not an issue of "proof" anymore. Any Hydrocardon plus oxygen will result in a mixture of (at minimum) of Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Monoxide, and Water Vapor. All of these components make the "correct" mixture of Nitrogen, Oxygen, Carbon Dioxide, etc that make up standard air polluted because each makes the air less suitable for human respiration. Furtermore, Carbon Monoxide is indeed harmful to humans, and a car's combustion can quickly pollute a enclosed space with enough carbon monoxide to kill humans.

Cars pollute.

Does car pollution cause global warming? Does car pollution constitute a health risk? Does car pollution cause long term contaimination of the air? All good debatable questions.


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