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MIT researchers create world's first computer model that is able to adequately mimic artificial vision

Scientists in Tomaso Poggio's laboratory at the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed a computational model of how the human brain processes visual information that specifically mimics how it recognizes street scenes.  The research could be used to help repair damaged brain functions while helping researchers further understand some of the locked mysteries of the brain.  

The original intent behind the research for Poggio has been to successfully develop a model that would be able accurately portray a visual system that would not only be good for neuroscientists and psychologist but also for purposes related to computer science.  "That was Alan Turing's original motivation in the 1940s.  But in the last 50 years, computer science and AI have developed independently of neuroscience.  Our work is biologically inspired computer science."

In the enclosed image, the Poggio model for object recognition is able to receive input as regular unlabeled images of digital images from a Street Scene Database and will then generate an annotation that detects important parts of the street scene.  The system is also able to detect cyclists, buildings, trees, different roads, and the sky.

One of the biggest drawbacks of better development of artificial intelligence is that the human brain is mysterious and extremely complicated to mimic.  While computers are obviously much faster, humans are smarter -- drawing a bridge between the two has been difficult. 


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RE: <no subject>
By Cogman on 2/28/2007 9:11:18 AM , Rating: 2
Well, I stand corrected http://www.dailytech.com/Robots+Swarms+Learn+to+Co...

It looks like the swiss have JUST found a way to evolve robots, which is basicly what humans have done. This could be interesting.

However, what I posted earlier, I still stand by it. The actions of these robots could be predicted with enough info. But it will get increasingly hard with each batch.


RE: <no subject>
By oTAL on 2/28/2007 12:48:53 PM , Rating: 2
Dude, you are repeating what I said... plus this is nothing new... the news post is about applying it to swarm like behavior and that has SOME novelty in it (I really liked the experiment and I believe it is very intelligent but it is only slightly evolutionary and nothing like "the swiss have JUST found a way to evolve robots").

I happen to know something about the subject and I am currently one of the members of the current champions team on an European AI competition (a minor league in RoboLudens).
I am by no means a big expert but I do know what I am talking about better than you.
As for the downrating I know it wasn't you (dailytech doesn't allow rating on articles where you post - and removes previous ratings done). I apologize for not having been clearer but some of my 'you's were generic and not pointed at yourself. Sometimes one does that kind of honest mistake since English is not my mother language and I sometimes find it a lot less precise than my mother language (in which such confusions are a lot harder to occur).

Still on the ratings, I am not posting for high ratings, but if you value your time and you still opt to give it away by posting knowledge, then you would wish people to read it - and preferably consider it useful. If I post something intelligent and it gets downrated - which means less people will read it - then maybe I won't be that eager to post next time. Time is money after all ;)


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