backtop


Print 18 comment(s) - last by oTAL.. on Mar 1 at 9:28 AM


Imprinting robots bond with study coordinator Dr. Lola Canamero.
Robots have feelings, too -- or at least they will -- pending the completion of a pan-European research project being led by a group of British scientists

The Feelix Growing project aims to design and build a series of robots that can interact with humans on an emotional level, and actually adapt their behavior in response to emotional cues from their human counterparts.

The official goal of the project is to conduct "interdisciplinary investigation of socially situated development ... as a key paradigm towards achieving robots that interact with humans in their everyday environments in a rich, flexible, autonomous, and user-centered way." To achieve this, the 2.3 million-Euro effort has assembled more than two dozen roboticists, developmental psychologists and neuroscientists from six nations.

The robots used in the project are simple designs, including some "off-the-shelf" models. The complexity lies in the software, which will construct artificial neural networks to pick up on human emotions exhibited via facial expressions, voice intonation, gestures and other behaviors.

The leader of the European Commission-funded project, Dr. Lola Canamero is a senior lecturer in the School of Computer Science at the University of Hertfordshire, England. She also serves as the principal investigator and coordinator of the university's Adaptive Systems Research Group, which focuses on researching socially intelligent agents, emotion modeling, developmental robotics, human-robot and human-computer interaction, embodied artificial intelligence and robotics, sensor evolution and artificial life.

In a recent interview with BBC, Canamero said the robots will be designed to detect basic human emotional states such as  anger, happiness, and loneliness. Once the states are detected, the robots will be programmed to perform a support role, by seeking to soothe an angry human, or cheer up a lonely or depressed one.

One of the first fruits of the Feelix Growing effort has been the production of a robot capable of "imprinting" behavior. The behavior is similar to the way many baby animals develop an instinctual attachment to the first adult they see at the time of birth, usually the mother. The imprinting robot prototype learns to recognize a particular human and follow that individual around, gradually adapting to the human's actions and emotional state, then interacting accordingly, Canamero said.

At the conclusion of the project, the scientists intend to build two robots that will combine aspects of the research being conducted at each of the eight partner sites scattered around Europe.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: No, they wont
By Visual on 2/27/2007 5:46:47 AM , Rating: 3
are you kidding?

about walking, there are enough projects already dealing with it and having a decent success, humanoid robots being able to walk just fine... but more importantly, have you considered that bipedal locomotion is by far not the perfect variant, and is only necessary if you need to achieve humanoid shape. there may not be robots that can outrun you on two feet, but there are designs with 3-8 feet or more, with wheels, caterpillar tracks, whole-body rolling and even jumping or flying, and quite a few of those can beat you in a race.

but of course even a perfect locomotion system is useless if the robot is blind or just too dumb to not run into walls and stuff. that's why they have to work on artificial intelligence before they can allow the robot to run, or "do anything useful" for that matter. and they are working on it.

robots may be stupider than monkeys for a lot of things, but for a few they are smarter than humans. and they'll improve.

granted, this article isn't directly about making the robots intelligent. but it is about an interesting (even if minor) part of the artificial intelligence field, and you still scoff at it.

and i totally don't understand your point about robots being dead. they are, and so what?


"If you look at the last five years, if you look at what major innovations have occurred in computing technology, every single one of them came from AMD. Not a single innovation came from Intel." -- AMD CEO Hector Ruiz in 2007











botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki