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Adtron's 96GB SATA SSD
Adtron's solid-state discs will offer read speeds of up to 70MB/sec

Flash solid-state discs (SSDs) have generated a lot of interest from mobile users in the past few months. SanDisk has showed off its 32GB 1.8" SanDisk SSD Ultra ATA 5000 back in January, while Ritek plans on launching 16GB, 32GB and 64GB SSDs later this year. Adtron is upping the ante with a 160GB SSD which will be available in SATA and IDE versions.

"New geometries and chip densities in SLC NAND enable Adtron to significantly expand the capacities of its industry leading high performance products," said Alan Fitzgerald, CEO of Adtron. "In addition, the economics of these new flash drives combined with the increased capacities in standard form factors, greatly expand the applications among our historic flash disk customers in the industrial and defense markets, as well as addressing bandwidth intensive server and storage acceleration applications in a much broader emerging market previously the domain of HDD products."

The IDE (I25FB) and SATA (A25FB) versions of Adtron's SSDs use SLC NAND flash memory and will be available in a standard 2.5" notebook form-factor. The I25B IDE SSD offers read speeds of up to 70MB/sec and write speeds of up to 60MB/sec. The A25FB is just a tad bit slower at 65MB/sec and 55MB/sec respectively.

The drives also feature the ArrayPro Performance Engine which enables the fast read/write speeds as well as Erasure Data Security which provides military-level protection. "ArrayPro separates an Adtron flash disk from the low-end single array SSD’s and those that employ caching technologies that require battery back-up and whose performance are highly application dependent," said Alan Fitzgerald, Adtron Chief Technology Officer.

There is no word on pricing or availability for Adtron's SSDs, but be prepared to shell out some big bucks. For reference, SanDisk's 32GB drive is pegged at around $600 while Ritek's 32GB drive will likely come in slightly below that figure so you do the math.



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eh hrm
By ElJefe69 on 2/26/2007 12:04:39 AM , Rating: 2
From what I understand, flash drives in general can wear out in terms of writes on them. infinite reads but have a lifespan that is not near a spinning disc hd.

anandtech said this last year.




RE: eh hrm
By livelouddiefast on 2/26/2007 1:14:27 AM , Rating: 1
as i recall, every drive has tech on it to prevent it from writing over the same spot unless absolutely necessary, as with all flash drives. Solid state drives are typically much more reliable than anything with moving parts.

Soon enough, hard drives will cease to be a bottle neck (phase change anyone?)

The question is- will hard drives ever become fast and stable enough to defeat the purpose of ram?


RE: eh hrm
By rippleyaliens on 2/26/2007 3:36:41 AM , Rating: 2
Well, i see no one has mentioned the ABSOLUTE killer with SSD drives.
It is the INSANE Disk I/O. We are talking about >6000 ips' per second. To give you an example, a cheetah 15k, the .4 series, pumps out data transfer rate of 130MB per second,But the IO of that drive is around 130-150. Give or take.
With a 6000 IO Rating, we are talking about DB queries, taking seconds versus min.. 2u Exchange servers, able to handle 1000's of users.
A typical exchange server for 1000 uers, needs about 50-70 drives. Just for the Disk I/O.
One user mentioned a 250gb SSD array. Most likely that is for a high End Database, Where I/O, is the performance booster.


RE: eh hrm
By Hawkido on 2/26/2007 12:23:43 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
A typical exchange server for 1000 uers, needs about 50-70 drives. Just for the Disk I/O.


Uh, I call BS on that statment.

I ran an AirForce Base's Exchange servers. ~7000 mailboxes on 9 servers (including 2 bridgehead servers which hosted no mailboxes) the mailbox servers only had 8 drives each. and hosted 500 to 1500 boxes on each. They ran fine, disk IO was no problem, and that was Exchange 5.5. Exchange 2003 was no problem either.

The argument that maybe we weren't fully ulilizing the e-mail is bogus. The Wing King (Base General) had my cell phone number and would call me within the minute if I took his mailbox server down (Damn Blackberry musta always be in his hand!)

If you think 1000 users is too much for your exchange server then I suggest you RTFM on how to configure your exchange hard drives and info stores.

mirror pair for os
mirror pair for logs
raid 5 for infostore
single drive (fat32) for Virtual Memory

You'll never have a problem with Disk IO.

Otherwise I agree with your statment. Great Show! Awesome Job!


"Well, we didn't have anyone in line that got shot waiting for our system." -- Nintendo of America Vice President Perrin Kaplan

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