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The science community takes a leery stance at D-Wave's quantum computer

Canadian company D-Wave Systems demonstrated earlier this week what it claims is the first commercial quantum computer, but scientists from the computing community are skeptical of D-Wave’s claims.

Specifically, the main criticism of D-Wave’s claims is that the company has yet to submit its findings for peer review—a common practice amongst the science community to gain acceptance of one’s work. "Until we see more actual measurements, it's hard to know whether they succeeded or not," said Phil Kuekes, a computer architect in the Quantum Science Research Group at Hewlett-Packard Co.'s HP Labs.

Although D-Wave’s origins are closely tied to the University of British Columbia, it is now a privately held company that may find it in its best interests to keep the details of the Orion quantum computer within the walls of its headquarters. In fact, the first public demonstration of the Orion was to an audience at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif., but the actual computer hardware remained at its home base in Canada. The demonstration took place via a live video feed.

Lieven Vandersypen, an associate professor at Delft University, offered his thoughts on D-Wave’s announcement: “First, it's quite remarkable that they have persuaded investors to put serious money in their enterprise at such an early stage,” he said, referring to the US$14 million D-Wave raised May 2006. “It sounds like they have a clear vision of where quantum computing is going, and how to approach it. Whether it is realistic, time will tell.”

The lack of scientific publication was also something Vandersypen pointed to, saying, “Until now, D-Wave hasn't published any major advances or breakthroughs in the scientific literature. With respect to their announcement, there is little detailed information available to support, and thus judge, the validity of the claims (as would be the case in a scientific publication).”

To further complicate matters, an examination into the technical details of Orion reveals that it is not a true quantum computer in the traditional sense of the term. D-Wave Chief Executive Herb Martin said that the Orion is not a true quantum computer, but rather a special-purpose machine that uses quantum mechanics to solve problems.

"Users don't care about quantum computing—users care about application acceleration. That's our thrust," Martin said to the Associated Press. "A general purpose quantum computer is a waste of time. You could spend hundreds of billions of dollars on it" and not create a working computer.

D-Wave detailed in its original announcement that it is combining design ideas from silicon computing and applying them to quantum computing. While it may not be a true quantum computer, Martin said that the evidence the company has indicates that the device is performing quantum computations.



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Still...
By scrapsma54 on 2/16/2007 10:28:07 PM , Rating: 2
If it can do quantum level computations, then it is still praiseworthy of an award. I for one accept the fact that it is a powerful asset and should be used widely. Why is it being discouraged? It is clearly a overly decent consumer solution.




RE: Still...
By Milliamp on 2/17/2007 2:11:14 PM , Rating: 2
For every revolutionary breakthrough, there are probably hundreds of other companies/people that are just blowing smoke for funding.

I don't think the community is trying to discourage this, rather, they have a responsibility to be skeptic.


RE: Still...
By masher2 (blog) on 2/18/2007 3:22:18 PM , Rating: 3
Exactly so...and venture capitalists trying to raise funds (a description which certain fits D-Wave) are guilty of far more "smoke blowing" than anyone else.

Am I a skeptic? Sure...I know how a qubit works using quantum entanglement. But via quantum tunneling? It's not clear to me how that would work...and D-Wave hasn't shared any details.


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