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The thin U100 candy bar

The U300 clamshell

The U700 slider
World's slimmest phone measures 5.9 mm thick

Samsung Electronics today at 3GSM 2007 launched its brand new Ultra Edition II handsets. The Ultra Edition II portfolio consists of two sliders, the Ultra Edition 10.9 (U600) and the Ultra Edition 12.1 (U700); a metallic clamshell, the Ultra Edition 9.6 (U300); and a candy bar handset, the Ultra Edition 5.9 (U100). Each of these designs offers 3 megapixel cameras, high-speed web connectivity, as well as extensive multimedia and audio capabilities.

“We believe that the Samsung Ultra Edition II range completely embodies everything that today’s consumers are seeking in a mobile in terms of unique design and flawless performance,” said Geesung Choi, President of Samsung’s Telecommunication Network Business. “We believe that the striking looks, exclusive feel and slim design of these devices, combined with uncompromised performance and function, will make the Ultra Edition II range an instant attraction to business users, fashion conscious consumers and multimedia enthusiasts.”

Of all its new handsets, Samsung is most strongly emphasizing that its new lineup contains what it claims to be the slimmest phone today: the Ultra Edition 5.9 (U100), besting its big brother, the Samsung X820. The Ultra Edition 5.9 (U100) official measurements of the sporty handset are 105.5 x 50 x 5.9 mm and features a 1.93-inch TFT.

The Ultra Edition II will be released in the European Market in the first quarter of this year.

Back in May, Samsung announced that it had created the world's slimmest cell phone with the SGH-X820. That phone was 6.9mm thick, featured a 2MP camera and weighed in at 66 grams.


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Thinner Phone = Less Shielding?
By cheetah2k on 2/13/2007 8:39:36 PM , Rating: 2
After working in the mobiles industry for 5 years, rolling out mobile towers (and other infrastructure) throughout Australia, EMR shielding should always be the greatest concern when designing a mobile phone. Albeit, the EMR (Electro Magnetic Radiation) emitted by a mobile phone is quite small (~0.4W idle to 0.9W during calls with low signal) it still remains to be seen how much protection you are loosing when "minaturising" or thinning these phones.

Industry wise, Sony Ericcson (mostly under the influence of Ericcson) and Nokia have some of the best shielding in phones around in terms of exceeding the required (antenna) shielding requirements. Historically, Samsung has met the requirements, but only just in this regard.

And as advised in my last round of Rad Haz awareness training, if you're on a mobile phone for long periods, and you feel a popping sound in the back of your ear, thats your brain tissue expanding as a result of EMR exposure. Take note, and use in moderation....

My 2 cents.








RE: Thinner Phone = Less Shielding?
By Polynikes on 2/13/2007 11:57:22 PM , Rating: 2
Provided you're not full of shit (it's the internet, I don't believe anyone until I see proof with my own eyes) that's actually really crazy. I'm glad I mostly use my phone as a watch and for short convenience calls.


By cheetah2k on 2/14/2007 12:18:29 AM , Rating: 2
I was informed this during my RAD HAZ training with MIT back in yr 2001 and re-iterated again at my certificate renewal in 2004. They were very worried about (at the time in Australia) Optus having unlimited free mobile calls after 7pm at night to 7am morning, as a lot of people were experiencing this effect after being on the phone for 2-3 hours. Plus the uncomfortable "hot" feeling on the side of the head above the ear.

No jokes here mate, i take my job seriously. MIT recommend to use all mobile phones in moderation, and not to have phone calls lasting over 10 minutes.

Cheers


"Nowadays, security guys break the Mac every single day. Every single day, they come out with a total exploit, your machine can be taken over totally. I dare anybody to do that once a month on the Windows machine." -- Bill Gates

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