backtop


Print 24 comment(s) - last by Lazlo Panaflex.. on Feb 2 at 2:16 PM

Intel's 2007 guidance outlines the projected volume of each SKU by the end of the year

Intel's latest partner guidance revealed the shipment numbers it projects for 2007.

Two immediate things jump out for desktop projections: by Q4 2007, more than 85% of processor shipments will be at least dual-core; and by Q4 2007 the company only expects 5% of its desktop shipments to transition to quad-core.

Not only will dual-core take the center stage by Q4, but the company's guidance is also very clear about removing all 90nm SKUs before then as well -- no more Pentium D, Pentium 4, or Celeron D.  This means there will only be four major components floating around in the channel and for OEMs: 65nm quad-core processors (Core 2 Extreme and Core 2 Quad), 65nm dual-core processors (Core 2 Duo), 65nm single-core Pentium E2000 and 65nm single-core Celeron 400.

All of these processors are in some way Conroe derivatives.  This is a large departure from Intel's 2006 channel where we had some 65nm Cedar Mill and Presler processors, a few 90nm Prescott and Smithfield derivatives and all the Core 2 Duo SKUs.  2008 will really be the first year in several where Intel will only support two generations of processors: Penryn and Conroe.

Intel's guidance expects approximately 5% of its Q4 2007 desktop market to transition to quad-core, approximately 70% to transition to dual-core Core 2 Duo, 20% to transition to single-core Pentium E2000 and the rest to fill in the single-core Celeron 400, which is really just the same as Pentium E2000 with half the L2 cache.

For the mobile business, the transition guide is much murkier.  Intel's guidance suggests that the company will even support the 90nm Dothan CPU in Q4 2007, though Core 2 Duo will assume 90% of the company's mobile volume by that time.  The rest of the market will fill in with legacy Yonah processors.

Intel's guidance for Q4 2007 on servers is also very clear: the company expects a 70-30 split between quad-core Clovertown and dual-core Woodcrest.  Where quad-core will only consume a small portion of the desktop market, the server market will be almost entirely dominated by quad-core.


Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Great to see dual core mainstream
By StevoLincolnite on 2/1/2007 10:02:38 AM , Rating: 1
Actually there have been benchmarks and theories and conclusions. For instance, even a single core optimized game saw benefits running dual core, What that comes down to is, the Operating system Probably hogs 1 processor, whilst the game hogs the other. Such improvements should be noticeable under vista. I agree the benefits of quad core haven't yet been realized, I'm thinking of skipping the dual core, and going straight for quad, at least It will be future proofed of sorts.


RE: Great to see dual core mainstream
By nerdboy on 2/1/07, Rating: -1
RE: Great to see dual core mainstream
By TomZ on 2/1/2007 2:40:36 PM , Rating: 3
Wrong, it absolutely does. And really, it is not as complicated as you make it sound. It is just a question of the scheduler looking at all the threads that are runnable at a given moment, and then distributing them across the available cores. The effect of a very busy app running mainly on one core and the operating system services that support that app running on the other is a natural consequence. I've run SMT and SMT+HT for many years, and I see this all the time.


By theapparition on 2/2/2007 9:54:16 AM , Rating: 2
TomZ is quite correct.
Actually, Windows does a fantastic job of managing core utilization.


"It's okay. The scenarios aren't that clear. But it's good looking. [Steve Jobs] does good design, and [the iPad] is absolutely a good example of that." -- Bill Gates on the Apple iPad

Related Articles
Life With "Penryn"
January 27, 2007, 12:01 AM













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki