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Full 65nm production in China with 45nm to come later

According to a report at CNET, Intel is in the process of launching a new fabrication facility in China. The new facility will focus on producing multi-core processors at the 65nm level. Inside sources were unable to give exact details on date and costs of the facility, but considering previous facility projects, the new plant is estimated to cost Intel roughly $2.5 billion to $3.5 billion USD. Just several years ago, a full plant would cost Intel nearly $5 billion.

Intel already has an established presence throughout China, making the new 65nm plant its third major operation in the country. Shanghai and Chengdu are two locations where Intel branches staff roughly 6,000 employees. CNET's sources indicated, however, that Intel would be making its China operation independent, thanks to the enormous market potential of China that is just second behind the U.S.

DailyTech previously reported that Intel was working on expanding its capacities in Vietnam, another hot region for tech companies. Although Intel's new plant investment will not be manufacturing actual processors, it would be contributing to such things as assembly and product testing.

While 65nm production levels out the mainstream, Intel announced near the end of 2006 that it will be introducing 45nm products sometime in the second half of 2007. The company announced not just one, but two fabrication facilities, capable of producing 45nm products.

Intel's Fab 32 in Arizona will be its first full facility in the U.S. in a long time and it will also be launching Fab 28 in Israel in 2008. Intel currently has over 15 products in development that will be manufactured at 45nm, but the company mentioned that until 2008 arrives, 65nm will be a key stage in processor and silicon development.


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RE: What processor tech do conservatives buy?
By Ringold on 1/16/2007 1:57:17 AM , Rating: 2
I haven't been there, or spoke to any one that has been recently, but my feeling is Europe is more anti-american than China is. The signals they send politically seem to say they're more pro-chinese than anti-american, which some times comes across as anti-american simply because we're used to people bending to our will much more easily and agreeably than they have. They seem to make a point of asserting their national manhood, so to speak.

At least, thats politically. Chinese people could burn little American flags and poke voodoo dolls of American soldiers at night before bed time for all I know. :)


By oTAL on 1/22/2007 2:51:54 PM , Rating: 2
My humble opinion is that here, in Europe, there isn't really that much of Anti-American feeling... there's more of an Anti-Bush feeling (for obvious reasons) and these two sometimes get confused... especially since Bush won (fairly, I might add) in 2004 - which was pretty much unbelievable for people in Europe.
Before the Bush era, the common feeling was the one still lingering to us from our grand-parents... the Marshall Plan days in which the great American people, after providing military help in a time of great need, decided to provide economic help in rebuilding Europe.

Clinton is still respected around here. But should we respect a government that lies, deceives, takes the former administration's commitments to the world, rips them a part and spits on everyone's face. A country that, when faced with diplomatic dispute decided to rename french kisses and french fries? Kyoto, International court, Iraq... even the words chosen by your president are sometimes insulting... when people are dying by the hundreds he yells Cowboy style "Bring 'em on!"

The truth is that no other country has a larger cultural influence in the world, mainly through Hollywood... but many of the intelligent people there are as "anti-American" as the European... same as they were in the McCarthy era...


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