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Full 65nm production in China with 45nm to come later

According to a report at CNET, Intel is in the process of launching a new fabrication facility in China. The new facility will focus on producing multi-core processors at the 65nm level. Inside sources were unable to give exact details on date and costs of the facility, but considering previous facility projects, the new plant is estimated to cost Intel roughly $2.5 billion to $3.5 billion USD. Just several years ago, a full plant would cost Intel nearly $5 billion.

Intel already has an established presence throughout China, making the new 65nm plant its third major operation in the country. Shanghai and Chengdu are two locations where Intel branches staff roughly 6,000 employees. CNET's sources indicated, however, that Intel would be making its China operation independent, thanks to the enormous market potential of China that is just second behind the U.S.

DailyTech previously reported that Intel was working on expanding its capacities in Vietnam, another hot region for tech companies. Although Intel's new plant investment will not be manufacturing actual processors, it would be contributing to such things as assembly and product testing.

While 65nm production levels out the mainstream, Intel announced near the end of 2006 that it will be introducing 45nm products sometime in the second half of 2007. The company announced not just one, but two fabrication facilities, capable of producing 45nm products.

Intel's Fab 32 in Arizona will be its first full facility in the U.S. in a long time and it will also be launching Fab 28 in Israel in 2008. Intel currently has over 15 products in development that will be manufactured at 45nm, but the company mentioned that until 2008 arrives, 65nm will be a key stage in processor and silicon development.


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What processor tech do conservatives buy?
By mlittl3 on 1/15/2007 8:53:20 PM , Rating: -1
I've noticed a lot of conservatives post comments on this website. By conservative, I mean, those who like Fox News, consider themselves republican, love G. W. Bush, etc.

I wonder what kind of processors these conservatives buy. Since AMD has all of its Fabs in capitalist, democratic countries (Germany and USA) and almost all of Intel's Fabs are in the Far East in Communist, Socialsists countries (Thailand, Malaysia, Vietnam, China), do conservatives like AMD over Intel? AMD gives jobs to western civilization societies. Intel does not. I wonder what the statistic is of conservatives buying certain tech made in certain countries.

Now I know many other components in the PC are made in the Far East (Taiwan and Japan are okay because they are capitalist/democratic) but it seems that conservatives would try to minimize the amount of money they give to Communist countries. Conservatives what say you? I know you are out there.




By Schadenfroh on 1/15/2007 8:59:43 PM , Rating: 2
What? Intel has plenty of fab plants in capitalist countries.


RE: What processor tech do conservatives buy?
By masher2 (blog) on 1/15/2007 9:11:30 PM , Rating: 3
> "and almost all of Intel's Fabs are in the Far East in Communist, Socialsists countries..."

Forget to get the old facts straight, eh? Here's a list of Intel's fab locations:

Chandler, AZ
Santa Clara, CA
Colorado Springs, CA
Rio Rancho, NM
Hudson, MA
Hillsboro, OR
Leixlip, Ireland
Jerusalem, Israel
Qiryat Gat, Israel

They have assembly sites (not fabs) in Phillipines, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Costa Rica, and China...but half of those nations are at least as capitalistic as Germany is these days.


RE: What processor tech do conservatives buy?
By Chillin1248 on 1/16/2007 9:18:02 AM , Rating: 2
I am very sure that Intel has a Fab here in Haifa, Israel.

I know that there are three huge Intel buildings in Haifa, one nearer to the north of Haifa, one by the South of Haifa which looks to be a research building (tall with windows) and another right by the one in the southern part which looks like a Fab (no windows, warehouse look).

-------
Chillin


By masher2 (blog) on 1/16/2007 10:34:28 AM , Rating: 2
As far as I know, the only Intel facilities in Haifa are R&D.


By Googer on 1/17/2007 3:26:22 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Report: Intel to Close, Sell Israeli Facilities


http://www.dailytech.com/Report+Intel+to+Close+Sel...


By Min Jia on 1/15/2007 9:39:36 PM , Rating: 2
AMD opened a R&D center in Shanghai just a few months ago.


By Pwnt Soup on 1/15/2007 9:57:13 PM , Rating: 2
put down the KOOL AID and step away from the keyboard please. people can dissagree over isues, and debate concerns. why do you bring it too that level?


RE: What processor tech do conservatives buy?
By creathir on 1/16/2007 12:47:52 AM , Rating: 2
I tend to go with what has the best performance.

As far as putting my money where my mouth is... I do, when a company openly supports agendas against my beloved country and the values I hold dear. Take Citgo for instance. I refuse to purchase gasoline from them. Yes, I know "big oil" (whomever they are) still buys oil from Mr. Chavez, but that does not mean I have to give my money DIRECTLY to him.

Technology wise, I dislike that China has a new FAB given their staunch anti-American attitude, but I also understand Intel is a global company, with a global reach. It is easier to supply chips to the Far East when you are making them there. I would view this more as a move of localization rather than "globalization"...

- Creathir


RE: What processor tech do conservatives buy?
By Ringold on 1/16/2007 1:57:17 AM , Rating: 2
I haven't been there, or spoke to any one that has been recently, but my feeling is Europe is more anti-american than China is. The signals they send politically seem to say they're more pro-chinese than anti-american, which some times comes across as anti-american simply because we're used to people bending to our will much more easily and agreeably than they have. They seem to make a point of asserting their national manhood, so to speak.

At least, thats politically. Chinese people could burn little American flags and poke voodoo dolls of American soldiers at night before bed time for all I know. :)


By oTAL on 1/22/2007 2:51:54 PM , Rating: 2
My humble opinion is that here, in Europe, there isn't really that much of Anti-American feeling... there's more of an Anti-Bush feeling (for obvious reasons) and these two sometimes get confused... especially since Bush won (fairly, I might add) in 2004 - which was pretty much unbelievable for people in Europe.
Before the Bush era, the common feeling was the one still lingering to us from our grand-parents... the Marshall Plan days in which the great American people, after providing military help in a time of great need, decided to provide economic help in rebuilding Europe.

Clinton is still respected around here. But should we respect a government that lies, deceives, takes the former administration's commitments to the world, rips them a part and spits on everyone's face. A country that, when faced with diplomatic dispute decided to rename french kisses and french fries? Kyoto, International court, Iraq... even the words chosen by your president are sometimes insulting... when people are dying by the hundreds he yells Cowboy style "Bring 'em on!"

The truth is that no other country has a larger cultural influence in the world, mainly through Hollywood... but many of the intelligent people there are as "anti-American" as the European... same as they were in the McCarthy era...


RE: What processor tech do conservatives buy?
By Ringold on 1/16/2007 1:53:21 AM , Rating: 3
Where do I start?! It's tough, but I'll try;

1) A true conservative should be pro free-trade and open markets, therefore, they'd care not where there things were made.

2) Thailand, Malaysia, Vietnam, China are all rapidly moving in the capitalist direction and in some ways are better at it than we are. (Hong Kong especially) Their trend is higher wealth, more open markets, not more socialism or, more accurately, dictatorship.

3) I can't BELIEVE you listed Germany in the 'capitalist' category. I could write a book on that. Go compare taxation, social services, government involvement in the economy and government involvement over social issues and then we ought to be able to agree that most of Europe is firmly in the 'socialist' category -- and indeed, they seem to be quite proud of it!

4)Trying to wage trade war to somehow hurt these dictatorships you mention would just be beating our heads against a wall, make the dollar weaker (these places LOVE our bonds), and throw our inflation for a loop. History (and economics) suggests that as their economy strengthens, and the middle classes are born, and education improves, the autocrats rule will weaken and democracy will move in. Best, then, to go with the flow.


If you check your history, it tends to be the liberal political groups who argue for isolation, not conservatives, and liberal groups who argue for trade barriers. There will be exceptions, of course, but in general terms, thats the historical precedent. I'm tempted to label the Democrat's as not understanding gains from trade, etc, over their complaints about "out sourcing America", but I think deep down they remember back to macro 101 about structural unemployment being natural, persistent, and a force for positive change, and they're taking the political opportunity to score points. Next election cycle, it could be reversed.

I think I've been baited, but there you have it.


RE: What processor tech do conservatives buy?
By ATWindsor on 1/16/2007 2:50:29 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
3) I can't BELIEVE you listed Germany in the 'capitalist' category. I could write a book on that. Go compare taxation, social services, government involvement in the economy and government involvement over social issues and then we ought to be able to agree that most of Europe is firmly in the 'socialist' category -- and indeed, they seem to be quite proud of it!


"Capitalism generally refers to an economic system in which the means of production are mostly privately owned and operated for profit and in which distribution, production and pricing of goods and services are determined in a largely free market."

Is capitalism and socialism opposed? A country can have a capitalistisc economy and still be socialistic. Besides, I would not agree that "most of europe" see themselfs as socialists. A lot of countries are gouverend by non.socialists at the moment.


RE: What processor tech do conservatives buy?
By masher2 (blog) on 1/16/2007 7:28:55 AM , Rating: 2
> "Besides, I would not agree that "most of europe" see themselfs as socialists..."

A European isn't worth his salt unless he can give you twenty different definitions of the word "socialism", and stretch the term to cover (or uncover) most any country in the world, depending on the needs of the moment.


By zaphikel on 1/16/2007 8:07:31 AM , Rating: 2
so how about enlightening us all, and give us your - objective american i guess - definition of "socialism"?

;-)


By ATWindsor on 1/16/2007 9:26:40 AM , Rating: 2
Socialism is a pretty broad concept,which covers a lot of diffrent meanings. I guess most people stretch sosialism abit far,alot of people label everything they don't like as socialism also


RE: What processor tech do conservatives buy?
By Ringold on 1/16/2007 6:12:27 PM , Rating: 2
I, and most other people familiar with this topic, place Germany solidly in the "socialist economy" category because of it's governments strong involvement in labor markets, high taxes, and its typical European proclivity towards protection of various industries, etc, along with its socialist view of economics in general (ie, the pie is fixed in size and one person becoming wealthier must therefore mean someone else become more poor, or that restricting working hours must free up hours for others to work), as well as its huge social welfare net which, despite having no military to speak of (in American terms), boosts its government spending as a part of GDP to 47%.


America's government is responsible for 18.4% of GDP as of 2001 (and is likely approximately the same now).

Heritage Foundation also rips Germany up for its labor, financial, and government freedom as well, all of which well founded and all of which have been brought up within the past 3 months in world news if you care to remember.

I'll agree that a country can be capitalist with some socialist tendencies (there is no pure example of either), but thankfully Europe doesn't come close enough to really leave room for debate. Eastern Europe, maybe, but thats less socialist-vs-capitalist and more an autocracy issue.


By Ringold on 1/16/2007 6:29:56 PM , Rating: 2
Follow on:

If the OP really wants to know what makes my laissez-faire-loving heart fill with warm fuzzy feelings, than here:

http://www.heritage.org/research/features/index/co...

*sniff sniff* Beautiful, man. Beautiful.


RE: What processor tech do conservatives buy?
By Viditor on 1/16/2007 6:44:30 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
America's government is responsible for 18.4% of GDP as of 2001 (and is likely approximately the same now)


That was from the Clinton years (which dropped the Government spending significantly). King George has brought us back up to the low to mid 20s now, and the CBO has projected that unless there are major fiscal policy changes (there almost certainly will be) we will be at 50%+ by 2050...


RE: What processor tech do conservatives buy?
By masher2 (blog) on 1/16/2007 9:12:02 PM , Rating: 2
> "That was from the Clinton years (which dropped the Government spending significantly)..."

Oops again. Federal outlays in 1992 were $1,381 billion. In 2000, Clinton's last year in office, they were $1,788 billion, nearly a 30% increase.


RE: What processor tech do conservatives buy?
By Viditor on 1/16/2007 9:18:14 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Oops again. Federal outlays in 1992 were $1,381 billion. In 2000, Clinton's last year in office, they were $1,788 billion, nearly a 30% increase


And the GDP grew dramatically as well (and unemployment dropped to almost nothing), so the percentages stayed low (far lower than Bush!)...but you're right in a sense. The first 2 years Clinton was in office were fiscally his most successful. That's because they were the only 2 years with a Democratic Congress...:)


RE: What processor tech do conservatives buy?
By masher2 (blog) on 1/17/2007 2:10:30 AM , Rating: 2
> "And the GDP grew dramatically as well...but you're right in a sense..."

I'm right, period. Your statement that Clinton "dropped Government spending" was incorrect.

> "...and unemployment dropped to almost nothing."

Unemployment under Clinton averaged 5.6%. Under Bush so far it has averaged 5.1%. And you know what? The policies of neither president have done much to affect the rate. Giving either of them credit is just plain silly.

> "The first 2 years Clinton was in office were fiscally his most successful..."

Anyone who believes a President can substantially affect the economy the first year they're in office has a lot to learn. Performance the year you're elected is primarily the result of policies put in place before you.


RE: What processor tech do conservatives buy?
By Viditor on 1/17/2007 2:55:00 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Your statement that Clinton "dropped Government spending" was incorrect

Getting back to taking it in context, it was government spending as a percentage of GDP.


RE: What processor tech do conservatives buy?
By Ringold on 1/17/2007 6:33:34 PM , Rating: 2
1) A great analysis done by the US Bureau of Economic Analysis back before the 06 elections showed the government spending inexorably climbs under BOTH Democrat and Republican controlled governments. If I had to make a shot gun statement where a rifle would be preferred, I'd imagine WHERE the money went would be the key difference; hand outs versus defense.

2) My 18.x% number from 2001 is accurate enough; the Iraq war has boosted government spending, but while Democrats think it's some monstrous number, in terms of our gargantuan economy, it's not that big a deal. Neither is our deficit. It's also a temporary expense, which will likely end abruptly in 2008, for ill or good.

3) You obviously had no other reason than perhaps wanting to make an empty post in trying to correct that figure, as the government would've had to double in size to match Germany's % of GDP since 2001, and even if it had, it'd only match Germany in GDP share and still be far less socialist in its peddling in the market and civil rights. Nice try, though.


By Ringold on 1/17/2007 6:37:40 PM , Rating: 2
Oh, and forgot about a couple other things..

4) The economy has also grown since 2001 along with government expenses, likely keeping a lid on it.

5) Those CBO numbers (I looked at likely the same thing you did) assume we sit on our hands with all these failing social programs of ours. We will not; we can not afford to, and American's wont want to be taxed like their poor European neighbors are. On the other hand, Germany's projected to have it even worse than the CBO thinks we will have it, as our population will remain younger over all than theirs. By the time we get anywhere near those estimates for 2050, we'll either have cut back or otherwise adapted, and Germany will either have cut back or become an economic disaster, so such long-range estimates are useless.


By crystal clear on 1/16/2007 3:56:55 AM , Rating: 3
What is Intel & Amd ideaology?-PROFITS,market share,share value,etc etc.Simple as that.

Conservatives,Socialists,Democrats,communists,Ext remist,
Fanatics,etc
ALL WANT QUALITY PRODUCTS & CHEAPER PRICES
MADE IN ANYWHERE

So your question is plain stupid & irrelevant.
Even Bin Laden will Buy Intel if it performs better than Amd
& CHEAPER .





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