backtop


Print 67 comment(s) - last by fxnick.. on Jan 20 at 1:36 AM


Possibly the new home of the PirateBay
Want to avoid copyright laws completely? Become your own nation

The group of people that run PirateBay.org have announced plans to purchase the man-made island called Sealand. The structure sitting out at sea was originally called HM Fort Roughs and was formally a Maunsell Sea Fort off the coast of England. Although Sealand does not have a government that is recognized by any country, the small population that it holds -- roughly ten -- does claim rights to sovereignty.

With that in mind, the owners of PirateBay.org plan to move their operation over to Sealand so that they can remain separated by any foreign government jurisdiction. Of course, there's one main reason why this is in the works to begin with, and it all has to do with avoiding copyright laws. According to the PirateBay.org group:

With the help of all the kopimists on Internets, we want to buy Sealand. Donate money and you will become a citizien. We’ve set up a forum to discuss how the country is supposed to function. It should be a great place for everybody, with high-speed Internets access, no copyright laws and VIP accounts to The Pirate Bay.

At this point in time, the number of donations are unknown and it is still unknown whether all this will even be possible. Even if the group claims Sealand to be their own, its government body may not be recognized by international treaties and countries. Despite this, the PirateBay.org group has a plan: "If we do not get enough money required to buy the micronation of Sealand, we will try to buy another small island somwhere and claim it as our own country (prices start from USD 50 000)."



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: for sale?
By BladeVenom on 1/12/2007 10:38:12 AM , Rating: 5
Those are not criminal enterprises, as both would be legal in Sealand.


RE: for sale?
By masher2 (blog) on 1/12/07, Rating: -1
RE: for sale?
By dreddly on 1/12/2007 12:08:07 PM , Rating: 1
You can play semantics with things like intellectual property because they are so dependent on the authority to decide and enforce the minute differences between fair-use and violation.

Their success with this will all depends on other sovereign nation's choice to allow it - if they choose to reject it, it is over, but if they allow it to persist through ignorance or lack of will - just like offshore finance - they could have some success.


RE: for sale?
By Ringold on 1/12/2007 12:22:51 PM , Rating: 5
I believe he was making it a moral issue instead of debating word games and legalese.

Rape and murder would be seen by the civilized among us as an ethical wrong, regardless of what the laws of the land state.

Likewise, taking something others labored on or perhaps had a minor stroke of genius on and reproducing it endlessly without their permission leaving them uncompensated for their work would be seen by the civilized among us as an ethical wrong. Again, regardless of the laws of men over the land.

Sort of like emminent domain. Law of the land in America says its fine. That doesn't make it ethical -- I'm waiting for a city to find a street with a bunch of die-hard gun-toting libertarians, blight it, and see what happens when they try to evict them off their own private property. Neither side would care much for semantic legal games there, either.

I don't think they'll have any success though; what are they going to do, hoist up a server farm on that little platform? Power this server with big socialist smiles? And when somebody snips its internet uplink? If they think they can be hosted elsewhere and just be legally registered in the micronation, well, I dont think that'll stop the West from going after it.


RE: for sale?
By FITCamaro on 1/12/2007 3:30:53 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
I don't think they'll have any success though; what are they going to do, hoist up a server farm on that little platform? Power this server with big socialist smiles? And when somebody snips its internet uplink? If they think they can be hosted elsewhere and just be legally registered in the micronation, well, I dont think that'll stop the West from going after it.


You know thats exactly what I was wondering. They'll have to buy internet access from someone and all the government of whatever nation has to do is make trade illegal with this new nation. The US already has laws to outlaw the export of certain goods to certain countries. I'm sure the British have the same. In the end these people aren't going to get anywhere.

I don't understand how you can feel that you're entitled to the work of others for free. Sure I have TV shows on my PC. But I feel I've already paid for them by watching them on TV (which I pay for) and sitting through the commercials(which pay for the show). I can record the shows myself if I want to so I don't see how getting them from someone else who's done it instead is wrong. If they made the seasons of the shows cheaper I wouldn't mind paying for them but paying $50 bucks a season for shows I already paid to see is wrong to me.

But as far as music, movies, and games, its wrong to pirate that stuff. Does that mean I've never done it? No. But I've never felt I have the right to the material without any potential consequences. The arguement that "these companies are already rich enough doesn't fly". Now with games its a touchy subject because if you pay $50 for a game, you want quality content. Not some hack job that they threw together to make a buck (looking at you EA). If the company doesn't release a demo, you should be able to return games you're not happy with. Yes I know the problems with this but still. How many games do they hype up by showing this commercial with awesome graphics and rave about the gameplay and then you play it only to be like "WTF?". Games companies need to be held accountable for the quality of their product just like every other manufacturer. The way things are right now I could purchase the rights to Pong, have a commercial made showing an awesome tennis game with great graphics(with disclaimer saying not actual gameplay footage), and then get $50 a pop for Pong.


RE: for sale?
By mindless1 on 1/12/2007 12:42:36 PM , Rating: 3
You seem a bit confused about what "legalize" means. There is nothing to legalize that has not been declared illegal in the first place. Kinda the whole point of their own country, even if it is a bit extreme. At least it's funny.


RE: for sale?
By Googer on 1/12/2007 4:04:10 PM , Rating: 5
quote:
HavenCo has been providing services since May 2000 and is fully operational, offering the world's most secure managed servers in the world's only true free market environment, the Principality of Sealand. Our testing period is now over, and we can offer services to all businesses which comply with our Acceptable Use Policy. Setup takes approximately 3-5 days, and dedicated servers in managed colocation, with ample bandwidth, are competitively priced with other secure centers around the world.

http://www.havenco.com/


RE: for sale?
By ShizNet on 1/13/2007 1:07:44 AM , Rating: 3
"...[woman] convicted of adultery and sentenced to death by stoning..."
this is UN recognised country, so what did you say before?
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/1885052.st...


RE: for sale?
By tuteja1986 on 1/13/2007 2:04:54 AM , Rating: 1
lol... Anyways all the movie industry have to do is hire a Mercenary and they will take care of sealand and pirate bay for good. International water has no law : )


RE: for sale?
By NullSubroutine on 1/19/2007 4:11:36 AM , Rating: 2
except for international law.


“We do believe we have a moral responsibility to keep porn off the iPhone.” -- Steve Jobs











botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki