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The latest AMD ATI roadmaps reveal details of more DirectX 10 graphics cards

DailyTech has just finished its briefing on the upcoming AMD ATI Radeon launches.  The company has three major launches over the next few months: codenamed R600, R610 and R630.

The R600, ATI's ultra-high-end Radeon X1950 successor, has a production date scheduled for February 2007.  The card will launch at or around the Cebit 2007 convention in mid-March.  Shipments will follow shortly after.

Our latest roadmaps indicate R600 will support unified shaders and GDDR4 or GDDR3 memory.  GDDR3 versions of the card running revision "A12" silicon appear to be making rounds in the blogsphere, and select press can even take a sneak peak  of the card under embargo here at CES.  The final silicon for R600 will be "A13."

A GDDR4 version of the card will be the flagship launch product. Clock frequencies on any R600 card have not been set officially yet, and will not appear on marketing material until just a few weeks before the launch.

The company has also added the R610 and R630 GPUs to the roadmap.  In the past, ATI has used lower number codenames to denote entry-level products.  We would suspect R610 would be the entry-level R600 cutdown, and R630 would be the mid-range chipset.  The Radeon roadmap puts both of these products on the shelf before June 2007.

All R600-series GPUs from ATI are compatible with DirectX 10.


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RE: Does this not seem like a late launch date?
By SunAngel on 1/9/2007 12:38:38 PM , Rating: -1
I respect your opinion. However, its just reinforces the hardline fence errected on DailyTech. Reviewing many comments on this site, Microsoft was the villian for so long. When XP launched it was such an absolute breakthrough in OS technology that the few device drivers that had conflicts, caused it to be scorched with the term "CrapOS". Now that Microsoft has refined the OS patch after patch, it is a fairly decent OS to work under. Have you ever wondered why hardware is not continually updated as regularly as software? Would the reinvestment to redesign and reegineer a tangible product cost more than designing it correctly from the beginning? How much would you like to bet, AMD ATI bring something really interesting to the market with DX10? I guess in all my rambling, being a superior product has its advantages and disadvantages. Being first to market brings bragging rights, but it also has the implication of bring bad karma. Do you intend to repurchase your XBox 360 for the digital HDMI 1080p output? How many XBox 360 owners do you expect to repurchase there systems to take advantage of output now or in the future? The only logical answer that remains to why the original XBox 360 did not include this output is greed. You and I both know, like the chicken and egg theorm, that software does not exist without hardware and vice versa. However, Sony is proving that Microsoft is secondary to its hardware. Hence, by allowing owners to install Linux on their systems to witness a pc-like experience. Microsoft understood this marketing attempt by Sony. Thus, the postponment of the ratified HDMI specs, would have been detrimental to the XBox 360 team and their bottomline. There is no likely event Microsoft would allow a full-blown version of Windows Vista to be installed on the XBox 360 (for free I might add). While Microsoft is toting the all-in-one idea of a home entertainment system, Sony has just done it. Now ask yourself, would I buy something for what it can do for me or would I buy something for what I can do for it? With the XBox 360 you continually have to buy for it to increase it functionality. How long will it be before you realize that fun and enjoy is playing and experiencing the device, and not constantly upgrading it? Please respond. Thanks.


RE: Does this not seem like a late launch date?
By Lakku on 1/10/2007 1:21:05 AM , Rating: 2
Please explain how Sony has supplied an all in one home entertainment system, why Linux would matter in this equation of anything related to entertainment, why installing Vista on the 360 would matter, and how Xbox Live being far superior to what Sony offers doesn't somehow give MS an advantage in bringing everything together right now. Also, how does Sony combat the fact MS is bringing IPTV to the 360, which makes it a DVR, Media Center Extender (face it, almost everyone who owns a PC has Windows, so this puts MS in a good position and makes the current philosophy behind the 360s design just right the way it is), game machine, DVD player (HD-DVD if you want), and an on-demand video service machine? Last I checked, the PS3 doesn't do as well as the 360 in serving as a streaming device from my PC for video, audio, and other media. Yes, I own both, and yes, the 360 has a better interface and is a better media extender. From my own experience, the 360 is just a better machine aside from the HD video aspect (meaning you get Bluray by default for one, HD DVD add on for the other), and I certainly don't need Linux on anything other then my PC should I chose. As a side note, the games aren't that impressive for the PS3, nor is the controller, but I bought it as a 499 dollar Bluray player that happens to play games, so no biggie. PS - Bluray had to many good movies coming to it or out for me not to have the ability to play them, and the 20GB PS3 is a great value for playing them.


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