backtop


Print 21 comment(s) - last by masher2.. on Jan 11 at 10:56 AM


Philips SWW1800
Now all we need is wireless power, and we're mobile!

At CES 2007 Philips introduced a device that can transfer an uncompressed HD signal over the air. Aside from being the first of its kind, Philips’ wireless HDMI “cable” is designed to replace conventional home theater wiring. Any home that currently uses an HDMI cable to transfer signals between their components and TV can use this unique device.

"HDMI is an established cornerstone for the HDTV industry, and Philips is extremely pleased to see such significant advancements for picture and sound quality,” said Glen McIlmail, CEO of Philips Accessories, North America. “Wireless HDMI presents an entire new category. For consumers who want the most advanced technology with the simplest connectivity, this is the only way to go.”

Wireless HDMI is an in-room solution that can transfer a 1080p signal without any signal loss. The signal is never compressed and retains all the attributes as if it were transmitted through a standard HDMI cable. By operating in the ultra wideband (UWB) range, the wireless cable experiences no interference from traditional devices (it functions free from obstruction of Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, cordless phones, microwaves and cell phones). Additionally, the wireless HDMI can be placed anywhere within a 25-foot range – in an entertainment center, in a closet, on the other side of the room. The cable also is compatible with HDCP.

The wireless HDMI device (SWW1800) will be available in May with a suggested retail price of $299.99.

Philips’ solution claims to be the first to offer an uncompressed, lossless signal, but it is not the first to move HDMI signals through the air. Last September, Tzero Technologies and Analog Devices announced their own wireless HDMI solution, which also makes use of UWB technology.

While Philips has not yet detailed exactly how its device operates, the Tzero and Analog HDMI Devices work by using a complex set of chips. On the transmit side, video data is compressed using Analog Devices’ ADV202 JPEG2000 video codec, combined with audio, then packetized and encrypted, and transmitted via the Tzero MAC and PHY chip. The RF chip transmits over the air to the receiver where the audio/video data with HDMI is decompressed and presented to the display device via the HDMI port.

The compression introduced by the Tzero and Analog Devices product is not a lossless one, and thus there is a drop in fidelity. Their design supports only up to 480 Mbps, though the bandwidth requirement for an uncompressed 1080i image is 2.2Gbps.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Impressive bandwidth
By ATWindsor on 1/10/2007 2:02:41 AM , Rating: 2
HDMi has pretty high bandwidth, I'm pretty impressed by the fact that they are able to transfer that bandwidth wireless.

It says that it doesn't get hampered by other wireless devices, I wonder if its the same the other way around, with a high bandwidth like taht, it could affect other devices. (I guess signal strength must be pretty high).




RE: Impressive bandwidth
By Brand0 on 1/10/2007 5:48:37 AM , Rating: 2
The problem is that the bandwidth is a lot less .

HDMI 1.3 has a bandwidth of 10.2 Gbps. This wireless HDMI has 480 Mbps, a drastic reduction from 10.2 Gbps.

I've heard of some wireless HDMI projects (on this site in fact; can't find link) that are in the Gbps range and much closer to 10.2 Gbps.


RE: Impressive bandwidth
By ATWindsor on 1/10/2007 6:26:54 AM , Rating: 2
How can it be uncompressed and lossless with only 1/20 of the bandwidth?


"This is about the Internet.  Everything on the Internet is encrypted. This is not a BlackBerry-only issue. If they can't deal with the Internet, they should shut it off." -- RIM co-CEO Michael Lazaridis











botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki