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Intel introduces Core 2 Quad Q6600, Xeon X3220 and X3210

Intel started shipping three new quad-core processors on Friday night. The three quad-core processors include the mainstream Core 2 Quad Q6600 and single processor workstation and server Xeon X3220 and X3210.

Intel Kentsfield Core 2 Quad
Processor
Number
Core
Frequency
Bus
Frequency
Launch Price
Q2'07
Q6600
2.40GHz 1066MHz $851 $530

The Core 2 Quad Q6600 slots right below the current king-of-the-hill Core 2 Extreme QX6700 which launched two months ago. It’s clocked slightly lower at 2.4 GHz and features 1066 MHz front-side bus. L2 cache size remains at 8MB like the Core 2 Extreme X6800. Pricing will be $851 per unit in 1,000 unit quantities with a price drop to $530 expected in Q2’2007. Online retailer ZipZoomFly currently has the Core 2 Quad Q6600 in stock for $989.99.

Intel Kentsfield Xeon
Processor
Number
Core
Frequency
Bus
Frequency
Launch Price Q2'07
X3220 2.40GHz 1066MHz $851 $530
X3210 2.13GHz 1066MHz $690 $425

Joining the current Xeon 3000 series of processors are the new quad-core Xeon X3200 series. These processors are based on the same Kentsfield core as the Core 2 Quad and quad-core Core 2 Extreme processors. The Xeon X3220 will be identical to the Core 2 Quad Q6600 albeit with Xeon branding. Slotted right below the Xeon X3220 is the X3210 which is clocked at 2.13 GHz. This model retains the same 1066 MHz front-side bus and 8MB of L2 cache as the other Kentsfield based processors.

Pricing for the Xeon X3220 is identical to the Core 2 Quad Q6600 at $851 per unit in 1,000 unit quantities with an expected price drop to $530 in Q2’2007. The lower clocked Xeon X3210 is priced at $690 per unit per 1,000 unit quantities with an expected price drop to $425 in Q2’2007.

In addition, Intel's single-core Allendale E4300 will also make its debut this week.


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By Ringold on 1/7/2007 4:57:33 PM , Rating: 2
I think you're overestimating DDR3 and PCI-E 32x's impact.

Looking at AMD (for the sake that its recent memory), and boost from DDR to DDR2? Minimal.

AGP to PCI-E? Minimal.

Neither worth an upgrade.

And as for future proofing in general.. My 1.5yr or so old comp, X2 3800+ @2.6ghz and X800XL, is powering along quite fine. It plays all the modern games at quite decent settings.

If my mothers computer wasn't rapidly falling apart, I wouldn't be about to build a new computer. E6600 + 8800GTS, which I'll swap in one of these new Q6600's after their price drop. That will, I suspect, last another 1.5 - 2yrs.

How much longer do you expect high-end performance to last? I can see some of your problem was poor selection in the first place -- if that was a 2.8C then thats good but you were insane with that FX5600. Good component selection and reasonable expectations of performance over time along with a little bit of good investment (can't get low end thinking it'll be great in six months) can very easily yield a computer that'll be solid for 1.5 - 2yrs.. or longer, depending on your own preferences for performance.


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