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Intel introduces Core 2 Quad Q6600, Xeon X3220 and X3210

Intel started shipping three new quad-core processors on Friday night. The three quad-core processors include the mainstream Core 2 Quad Q6600 and single processor workstation and server Xeon X3220 and X3210.

Intel Kentsfield Core 2 Quad
Processor
Number
Core
Frequency
Bus
Frequency
Launch Price
Q2'07
Q6600
2.40GHz 1066MHz $851 $530

The Core 2 Quad Q6600 slots right below the current king-of-the-hill Core 2 Extreme QX6700 which launched two months ago. It’s clocked slightly lower at 2.4 GHz and features 1066 MHz front-side bus. L2 cache size remains at 8MB like the Core 2 Extreme X6800. Pricing will be $851 per unit in 1,000 unit quantities with a price drop to $530 expected in Q2’2007. Online retailer ZipZoomFly currently has the Core 2 Quad Q6600 in stock for $989.99.

Intel Kentsfield Xeon
Processor
Number
Core
Frequency
Bus
Frequency
Launch Price Q2'07
X3220 2.40GHz 1066MHz $851 $530
X3210 2.13GHz 1066MHz $690 $425

Joining the current Xeon 3000 series of processors are the new quad-core Xeon X3200 series. These processors are based on the same Kentsfield core as the Core 2 Quad and quad-core Core 2 Extreme processors. The Xeon X3220 will be identical to the Core 2 Quad Q6600 albeit with Xeon branding. Slotted right below the Xeon X3220 is the X3210 which is clocked at 2.13 GHz. This model retains the same 1066 MHz front-side bus and 8MB of L2 cache as the other Kentsfield based processors.

Pricing for the Xeon X3220 is identical to the Core 2 Quad Q6600 at $851 per unit in 1,000 unit quantities with an expected price drop to $530 in Q2’2007. The lower clocked Xeon X3210 is priced at $690 per unit per 1,000 unit quantities with an expected price drop to $425 in Q2’2007.

In addition, Intel's single-core Allendale E4300 will also make its debut this week.


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RE: I like this. But I'll wait for a while.
By iNGEN on 1/7/2007 3:13:18 PM , Rating: 2
Multicore has usefulness in gaming right now. Some of it more desireable than what can be offered by a faster graphics card. For example, during a typical gaming session I run: Battlefield 2142, Teamspeak, Ventrilo, FRAPs, Comcorder, NetMan, Setpoint (with dynamic profiles), Saitek Keymanager (for macros), as well as all the Windows processes. Now, I'm not aware of any of those being multithreaded apps, but using my A64 4000+ at 2.8Ghz, I average 52fps in game with around a 15fps minimum. When I drop in my 4400+ at the stock 2.2Ghz, I average 49fps with a 38fps minimum. Those frame rates are averages of more than 10 hours of real play on each config. (thank you FRAPS)

Needless to say, my 4000+ now sits in a box on my shelf.


By willow01 on 1/7/2007 8:53:47 PM , Rating: 2
Exactly. This is where you will see a benefit in multiple cores now, running multiple apps at the time, especially if they are more cpu intensive than io. As for the future, seeing as though the Xbox 360 and the PS3 (less so because of its different approach with Cell), game developers will be learning and investing more time into utilising multiple processors, as more experience is gained.


"Vista runs on Atom ... It's just no one uses it". -- Intel CEO Paul Otellini

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