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Print 15 comment(s) - last by retrospooty.. on Dec 29 at 7:20 PM


Hitachi's 800x480 mobile phone display - Image courtesy Tech-On
2.9" and 800x480 to boot

Mobile web browsers rejoice as Hitachi has started mass producing its newest LCD mobile phone display according to Japanese site Tech-On. The new LCD is 2.9 inches and sports the highest resolution ever found on a mobile phone display—800x480.

The added resolution will allow users to browse mobile web pages easier without having to scrolling side-to-side for less phone friendly web pages. However, the real payoff for such displays is the ability to play 480i content with menus.

The bump to 800x480 is a fairly large pixel increase from the current QVGA (320x240) screens found on most new phones and a moderate increase from VGA (640x480) screens used in some PDA phones.

The new 2.9” LCD uses IPS LCD technology instead of TN typically used in mobile displays today. The advantages of IPS over TN are wider viewing angles, better color reproduction and faster response times. This results in a 170 degree vertical and horizontal viewing angle and a 400:1 contrast ratio.  Hitachi owns the rights to IPS technology, but most LG.Philips LCD panels use some derivative of the technology for desktop displays. 

There’s no mention when and which phone manufacturers will release products based on the new display.


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Very nice. I likes.
By therealnickdanger on 12/28/2006 2:04:30 PM , Rating: 3
Still... we're talking about a cell phone. Even with, say, a 16GB SD card or something, would you want to watch ripped DVDs or other video content on it?

I say that they should take advantage of this large, high-res screen and make it a touchscreen and do away with buttons altogether.




RE: Very nice. I likes.
By retrospooty on 12/28/2006 2:15:00 PM , Rating: 1
Not me... The other thing to consider is the screen size simply makes the phone too large for most users, 99% of the public has been screaming for smaller sleeker devices. I see this as a niche market at best.


RE: Very nice. I likes.
By edpsx on 12/28/2006 2:34:45 PM , Rating: 2
Niche market. no. PDA/Smartphones. YES.. I would love to have this screen on my Treo any day of the week. So no its not just a gimmicky screen thats too large, its perfect for alot of sectors in the market.


RE: Very nice. I likes.
By Hydrofirex on 12/28/2006 3:55:13 PM , Rating: 2
I agree, cell phones are going to keep getting faster and having more functionality. Displays like this are going to be a must one day.

HfX


RE: Very nice. I likes.
By johnsonx on 12/28/2006 5:09:58 PM , Rating: 2
Agreed. Within a two weeks of upgrading my dying Kyocera 7135 (PalmOS 4.1.2, 160x160 display) to a new Palm 700p (PalmOS 5.4.9, 320x320 display), I got over the 2x resolution increase and started wondering about an even higher res display. 800x480 would be perfect. Palm 800 anyone?


RE: Very nice. I likes.
By retrospooty on 12/29/2006 7:13:15 PM , Rating: 2
Thats my point, it wont fit on a Treo. Your Treo would have to be HUGE to fit this screen. PDA's are dead as far as a consumer mass production product. This is closer to a small UMPC than a phone size screen.


RE: Very nice. I likes.
By xphile on 12/29/2006 4:13:24 AM , Rating: 2
I totally agree with you on this one. We all watched as phones got smaller and smaller with all the great hype over how they came to fit in your pocket and were super lightweight etc. Then when they got as small as they could go (too small for many trying to use some keypads got near impossible) all the companies moved focus to pack more & more features into each phone. Then came broadband digital and that really is great (if still expensive) and now the features have improved even more with fast internet and video capabilities on every phone.

But the kicker now is that the human body doesnt change, so for video & visuals we always want the biggest, best resolution screen, which goes directly against 20 plus years of mobile cellular technology making them all small as hell; they are having to make them bigger and bigger again, even if many are still pretty light weight. Bit of a catch 22 for phone makers isnt it. I can make you a phone that can store multi-gigabyte movies, but how to make them really watchable?

I think the answer will come via two possible additions. The first is a simple projection option - where the phone can dump a screen (on a wall etc in high res), and the second would be add on eyepieces in the same way you have ear pieces. This isnt immediate mass-market stuff but logic says they must all be looking at the various options to make a killing in the personal mobile market. Personally I dont see screens on the actual phones/devices as the long term answer. They have been fine up until now, but the new visual demands on making a personal communicator have one major unchangeable restriction; us.


RE: Very nice. I likes.
By TravisO on 12/29/2006 10:19:58 AM , Rating: 2
Makes the phone too large????

Umm no, the screen is only 2.9", which is a normal screen size on a generous phone, this is nowhere near PDA sizes, which are around 4.5" or more.

Higher res means more sharper text & graphics, not bigger screen.


RE: Very nice. I likes.
By retrospooty on 12/29/2006 7:20:25 PM , Rating: 2
yes, me understands size vs res. The res is great, really great, but 2.9 inches is large for a phone. Check the best selling smartphones these days. Moto Q, Blackberry pearl, Samsung blackjack, and Palm Treo. All are moving smaller and thinner. none have a screen anywhere near that size. Phones are shrinking and PDA's are a thing of the past. A few phones have slider designs that have large screens like this, but arent really hot sellers, and they all break alot, sliders are prone to fail.


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