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Image courtesy Samsung
Look mom, no wires!

Fuel cell-based notebooks are nothing new to frequent readers of DailyTech. In early June, we reported on Toshiba's early efforts with a fuel cell notebook dock that was able to power a Portege notebook for 10 hours. In October, the company showed off an updated version of its fuel cell dock -- this time with a smaller fuel cell stack that was confined within the footprint of the host notebook.

Samsung is taking fuel cell technology for notebooks to the next level by showcasing a new DMFC (Direct Methanol Fuel Cell) dock that can power a Q35 ultraportable notebook for 8 hours a day for a full month. According to Samsung press release, the fuel cell has an energy density of 650Wh/L and total energy storage of 1,200Wh.

Samsung has also made many improvements to its fuel cell system that reduces noise levels. The new systems has noise levels comparable to current notebook computers which gives Samsung an edge over competing fuel cell designs.

Fuel cell technology has come a long way during the past year. Just last month SAIT and Samsung SDI showed off a prototype fuel cell battery charger that weighs just 5.3 ounces. Likewise, Nokia envisions that fuel cell-powered mobile phones are just a few years away.



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RE: Wow this is cool
By sadffffff on 12/28/2006 3:20:39 PM , Rating: 2
fuel cells are utter rubbish. theyre neat and all, but theyre certainly not viable to widespread use, nor are they any kind of solution to a power problem


RE: Wow this is cool
By devolutionist on 12/28/2006 8:36:07 PM , Rating: 2
Kind of like phones, TVs, cars, and aircraft were utter rubbish when they were being developed.

That's a seriously shortsighted comment and I really hope you were being facetious.


RE: Wow this is cool
By Ringold on 12/29/2006 3:45:24 AM , Rating: 2
I have a feeling they wont be intended for widespread use. Does a typical undergrad, or most grad students, need a month of power? No, not when he/she has to go and BUY methanol to pour in that thing when they can go mooch power all around campus. Like others have said though, a month, or even a few days, of power would be huge to some groups of people.

They'll make fuel cells and their target markets will prosper; people that need it will be more productive, and everyone involved makes more money.

The rest of us will think "gee whiz, thats cool stuff, a month of power!" while we continue happily, too, in our own lives with future generations of battery power.

I dont see how that makes them rubbish. They dont have to be viable for widespread use, just use in the target markets, and they *are* a solution to the power problem which faces their target markets: if power was available from a 110v AC socket every 3ft across America, then nobody would need batteries, much less a high-capacity system like this.


RE: Wow this is cool
By nurbsenvi on 12/29/2006 9:24:53 AM , Rating: 2
Of course you would need months of power...

Think about it, a total freedome from the wires
everything is wireless these days so if your laptop can be charged from pouring in some liquid once a month, that laptop is wire free forever.

I just hope methanol is as cheap as patrol so I won't need to pay anymore than $4 bucks a month for powering my laptop.

if this trend continues far enough some day we will all be free from all wires and will be pouring methanol everyware

like your home theater wirelss speakers that only need refuelling every 6 month or your complete wireless OLED monitor!

you could even have a modular computer system that has all it's components seperated, wirelessly connected and spread all over the place!!

with samsung it's not hard to imagine.


"We don't know how to make a $500 computer that's not a piece of junk." -- Apple CEO Steve Jobs














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