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Nintendo must have seen this coming

As was bound to happen, law firm Green Welling LLP filed a nationwide class action lawsuit on behalf of the owners of the Nintendo Wii against Nintendo of America. The class action lawsuit contends that the Nintendo Wii is defective in nature due to the wrist strap for the remote.

The statement from the firm says that Nintendo is in the wrong as owners of the Nintendo Wii who supposedly followed the material that accompanied the Wii console experienced broken wrist strap causing the remote to leave the user’s hand. The lawsuit seeks an injunction that requires Nintendo to correct the defect and to provide a refund to the purchaser or to replace the defective Wii remote.

“Nintendo’s failure to include a remote that is free from defects is in breach of Nintendo’s own product warranty,” the statement reads. “The class action lawsuit seeks to enjoin Nintendo from continuing its unfair or deceptive business practices as it relates to the Nintendo Wii.”

The class action lawsuit now awaits approval from a judge. Nintendo has already responded to wrist strap worries with stronger materials and safety reminders. Last week Nintendo started offering free wrist strap replacements for all Nintendo Wii owners, allowing its users to upgrade to the safer and hopefully less accident-prone equipment.



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Followed the instructions, eh?
By psychobriggsy on 12/20/2006 8:31:58 AM , Rating: 2
The instructions that tell you to let go of the Wiimote when playing?

Wait. No, they say you should keep hold of the Wiimote.

The strap is there to protect against accidental drops, not to be used as a 'remote catcher' by people who actually let go of the device when throwing the baseball in Wii Sports. It's to protect your glass coffee table from an accidental drop/slip, not your TV from a Wiissile.

The common theme with strap problems is that someone has been playing incorrectly. I think the fact that Nintendo realised so quickly that a small portion of their customer base is retarded and altered the strap design to compensate is actually a good move.




RE: Followed the instructions, eh?
By Aikouka on 12/20/2006 8:39:13 AM , Rating: 2
I always thought the point of the strap was so you could let go of the Wiimote without having to set it down? That's what I used it for when using the Wii, and what I was also advised to do by the owner of the console when I kept holding it in my hand as I wasn't really using it.


By THEREALJMAN73 on 12/20/2006 8:55:23 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
I always thought the point of the strap was so you could let go of the Wiimote without having to set it down? That's what I used it for when using the Wii, and what I was also advised to do by the owner of the console when I kept holding it in my hand as I wasn't really using it.


The wii-mote is made to support itself durring "normal" usage - not being swung around someone wrist as fast as they can swing it.

I am hardly a Nintendo fanbois and I still think this lawsuite is a waste of time and resources. I hope the court tosses it out and makes the lawyers pay for all fees involved.


RE: Followed the instructions, eh?
By webstorm1 on 12/20/2006 2:56:30 PM , Rating: 2
I can't stop laughing after reading "Wiissile." That's about the funniest thing I've heard in a long time!


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