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But if you're a teacher, you can rip DVDs

There's no doubt in the world that Apple's iPod is leading the race in terms of sales, popularity, and social status. Apple has done an incredible job at keeping its multimedia pocket-wizard at the top of people's wish lists. Out of the three available flavors of the iPod, the video iPod is Apple's flagship; able to play not only music but also games and full length movies. Despite its features however, movie playback is where controversy has stirred.

This week, the US Library of Congress rejected a petition that would allow US iPod owners from copying movies that they own, onto their iPods. This does not mean that users can't copy movies over -- they would have to purchase licensed iPod versions from Apple's iTunes store. According to the rejection, users are not allowed to rip DVDs that they own for use on their iPods. Ripping DVDs by nature is against a number of legal rules and regulations and is definitely frowned upon by the MPAA.

The original petition submitted to Congress was written by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), which is responsible for defending the rights of many media publications and independent organizations. The petition argued that DVD ripping software was now mainstream, and should be accepted as part of business as well as personal use. The EFF also indicated that if the user owned an original copy of a movie, they should be able to watch it on their iPod.

Despite the MPAA's stance that DVD copying and ripping hurts the industry, the EFF argued the following:

The empirical evidence proves just the opposite. During the previous exemption period,
DVD sales and profitability continued to grow at an astonishing pace.29 In fact, DVD sales have proven to be more profitable for motion picture studios in recent years than the formats they replaced, even at a time when DVD ripping software has been popular.30 In addition, major motion picture studios have continued to release new DVD titles in ever-increasing numbers.


The EFF also noted the following about CSS encryption:

Whatever the contribution of CSS to the availability of content on DVD may have been in the past, today the motion picture industry’s willingness to release material on DVD is plainly not correlated to any security provided by CSS.

iPod owners will have to purchase and download legal movies from Apple's online store, which in many cases means that they will have duplicate copies of movies they already own. Despite the ongoing restriction on DVD ripping and copying, the Library of Congress has allowed limited ripping for use in an educational environment only. Professors and instructors in the video industry are allowed to rip DVDs to create clips and instructional materials for teaching.

Movie studios argued that the education industry should be using lower quality VHS rips instead of using DVDs -- even with Congress's blessing.


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Ughh
By mydogfarted on 11/27/2006 4:29:47 PM , Rating: 5
I just don't understand why the MPAA and RAIA just don't get that all they end up doing is pissing off the legitimate customers who pay for their products. Pirates are always going to find ways to break copy protections.




RE: Ughh
By Teletran1 on 11/27/2006 6:27:00 PM , Rating: 5
They want you to buy it on DVD, then buy it in a format that is more portable. These assholes are greedier by the minute.

How about providing me a copy that I can transfer to my portable movie player in the package rather than having to pay FULL price for it.

Or have a coupon in the box that allows me to go online, fill in my info, enter some sort of code, and download it for free. Fill it with DRM if you want. I already paid for your stupid movie. A new movie in Canada is like 20+ dollars. I am not paying twice. These assholes need to start adapting to technology rather than trying to stop technology.


RE: Ughh
By kristof007 on 11/28/2006 3:35:47 AM , Rating: 3
Agreed! I mean talk about milking the customer for everything they have! This is insulting.

They should be happy if you actually buy the DVD. Most people today have their cable subscription and record the movie on their DVR from some movie channel OR rent it from netflix and burn it. If you are willing to pay for the DVD, the process of putting the movie onto your iPod should be as easy as Teletran1 describes, if not easier!


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