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"You know, Sony can make 80,000 bricks, and people would buy them."

With Microsoft having just completed development on two major software releases and having recently secured a partnership with Novell on Suse Linux, Bill Gates surely has a lot to talk about. CNET's Ina Fried was able to interview Microsoft's founder and get his thoughts on the recent happenings at Microsoft.

Right of the bat, the discussion turned towards Windows Vista. The operating system went gold two weeks ago and is due to be available to retail customers on January 30. Bill Gates was drilled on the future of the SQL-based WinFS (Windows Future Storage). The feature was due to ship with Vista and was later dropped altogether.

"Well, you definitely still want a structured look for certain kinds of rich query. And if we're going to bring all these things of e-mail and files and photos, bring it together fully, we need more than just the search indexing. Search indexing takes you further than people expect, I would say. But eventually you'll need more of a database-type look to these things," said Gates.

Gates also went on to talk about the recent partnership with Novell. "In general, Linux is not nearly as high-volume as Windows is on servers. But (it's) significant, so customers want new kinds of interoperability." Gates goes on to say "We've done fantastic things on interoperability. Here, we're doing virtual machine interoperability. So you can just have a pool of hardware and applications that use Linux, applications that use Windows, and just have the VM manage which one needs more resource, which one is done, which one needs to be restarted."

On the subject of Microsoft's Xbox 360 console, which now has prime competition in the form of the Sony PlayStation 3 and Nintendo Wii, Gates is quite confident in the gaming platform. In fact, Gates wasted no time in touting Microsoft's enviable one-year head start on the market. "You know, Sony can make 80,000 bricks, and people would buy them. So the real competition--you're going to see the impact of our innovation and all the momentum we have in Christmas 2007. This Christmas, the story is: XBox 360 is going to sell super-well, and they'll sell the rounding error amounts they can make."

For the full interview, head on over to CNET News.



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By psychobriggsy on 11/20/2006 9:41:23 AM , Rating: 5
A decent OS doesn't let dodgy application software destabilise it.

However the OS isn't helped by application software trying to alter system libraries and configurations. Hence the increasing level of system file protection in Windows to stop applications (and more sneaky software) altering the OS.

We all know the sheepbrained masses won't bother to learn how to run a computer properly so they don't get viruses, spyware and all that. Even if the OS enforced non-administrator accounts for users, they'd happily pop in their password when it said "SpyOnYou Pro 4 Installer blah blah"...

The safest OS would be one that only executed applications that were signed by the OS vendor. If Microsoft went that route, you can imagine the uproar about limiting freedom, etc, even if the service was free and merely involved checking that the application was safe for end users. OTOH this is what Microsoft is moving towards for drivers (WHQL etc), but that's because it will guarantee good quality drivers only.


By Aikouka on 11/20/2006 10:30:16 AM , Rating: 1
The OS gives a lot of power, but so do most Linux variants. The thing is, almost everyone runs Windows as an Administrator, which is comparable to always running Linux in root (there's the "su" command in linux for a reason). Unfortunately, explaining to users that they should receive less access priviledges would probably fall on a deaf ear as most people would either not care or find it offensive that you consider them "too stupid" to manage Windows.


By kamel5547 on 11/20/2006 12:32:49 PM , Rating: 2
Well at least for home users... most of our user base runs as "power user" and cannot install *most* applications. Mind you I hate companies (Google for example) that design their applications so they cna be installed without admin privileges. Its amazing how little spyware there is compared to when people ran as admins. Of course it also has the side benefit of keeping all the licensing ducks in a row.


"Mac OS X is like living in a farmhouse in the country with no locks, and Windows is living in a house with bars on the windows in the bad part of town." -- Charlie Miller

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