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AMD unleashes 65nm beginning in December

AMD’s long awaited 65nm Brisbane core products are just around the corner. DailyTech previously reported that Brisbane is expected to launch in December. AMD’s latest roadmap shows Brisbane 65nm products will arrive as scheduled. Brisbane will be AMD’s first 65nm core and is expected to launch with four parts. The four 65nm Brisbane core based products include the Athlon 64 X2 5000+, 4800+, 4400+ and 3800+. All four models will have 2x512KB of L2 cache and a 65W TDP rating.

AMD Athlon 64 X2 Brisbane 
Model
Core
Frequency
L2 Cache
TDP Expected
5400+ 2.8 GHz 2x512KB 76W Q2'07
5200+ 2.7 GHz 2x512KB 65W Q2'07
5000+ 2.6 GHz 2x512KB 65W
December
4800+ 2.5 GHz 2x512KB 65W December
4400+ 2.3 GHz 2x512KB 65W December
4000+ 2.1 GHz 2x512KB 65W
December

Two additional products will switch over to the Brisbane 65nm core in Q2’2007. This includes the Athlon 64 X2 5200+ and 5400+. The Athlon 64 X2 5600+ will be clocked at 2.8 GHz with a 2x512KB L2 cache configuration. Unlike the lower Brisbane products it will have a 76W TDP rating. AMD’s Brisbane based Athlon 64 X2 5200+ will differ from the current Windsor offering. Instead of the 2.6 GHz clock speed and 2x1MB L2 cache configuration of the Windsor based Athlon 64 X2 5200+, the Brisbane based Athlon 64 X2 5200+ will have a 2x512KB L2 cache configuration and 2.7 GHz clock speed. The Brisbane Athlon 64 X2 5200+ also has a 65W TDP like other Brisbane products.

AMD Athlon 64 X2 Brisbane Energy Efficient
Model
Core
Frequency
L2 Cache
TDP Expected
4400+ 2.3 GHz 2x512KB 35W Q3'07
4200+ 2.2 GHz 2x512KB 35W
Q2'07
4000+ 2.1 GHz 2x512KB 35W Q2'07
3800+ 2.0 GHz 2x512KB 35W
Q2'07

Also arriving in Q2’2007 is energy efficient Brisbane based products. These Energy Efficient processors will have a 35W TDP and be available in Athlon 64 X2 4200+, 4000+ and new 3800+ models. Joining the energy efficient product lineup in Q3’2007 will be the Athlon 64 X2 4400+. The energy efficient Athlon 64 X2 4400+ carries the same 35W TDP as the other low power Brisbane products.

AMD Athlon 64 Lima
Model
Core
Frequency
L2 Cache
TDP Expected
4000+ 2.6 GHz 512KB 45W Q2'07
3800+ 2.4 GHz 512KB 45W
Q1'07
3500+ 2.2 GHz 512KB 45W Q1'07

AMD’s dual-core product lineup isn’t the only lineup switching over to 65nm. Single-core Athlon 64 products based on the 65nm Lima core will arrive in January 2007. Two initial single-core Lima products will be introduced. These products are the Athlon 64 3800+ and Athlon 64 3500+. Joining the 65nm single-core party in Q2’2007 is the Athlon 64 4000+. All single-core Lima based products carry a 45W TDP rating and have 512KB of L2 cache.

AMD Sempron Sparta
Model
Core
Frequency
L2 Cache
TDP Expected
3800+ 2.2 GHz 256KB 35W Q2'07
3600+ 2.0 GHz 256KB 35W
Q2'07
3500+ 2.0 GHz 128KB 35W Q2'07
3400+ 1.8 GHz 256KB 35W
Q2'07

Not to be left out of the 65nm transitions is the Sempron product lineup. In Q2’2007 AMD will release four 65nm Sparta based Sempron products. The Sempron Sparta based lineup includes the 3800+, 3600+, 3500+ and 3400+ clocked at 2.2 GHz, 2.0 GHz, and 1.8 GHz respectively. All four Sparta based products carry a 35W TDP. Three of the Sparta based products have 256KB of L2 cache while the Sempron 3500+ only has 128KB of L2 cache.


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2.7ghz? I dont get it
By OcHungry on 11/14/2006 4:01:43 PM , Rating: 2
What is the base FSB for these 2.7, 2.3ghz?
is it odd multiplier or has the fsb changes to 2xx?
please elaborate on this?
thanks




RE: 2.7ghz? I dont get it
By Furen on 11/14/2006 4:19:55 PM , Rating: 2
The CPUs will support half-multipliers, which is why we'll see lots of speed grades.


RE: 2.7ghz? I dont get it
By superunknown98 on 11/14/2006 4:19:58 PM , Rating: 2
13.5 x 200=2700


RE: 2.7ghz? I dont get it
By OcHungry on 11/14/2006 7:20:48 PM , Rating: 2
I don’t think this is the case because, as I understand it, AMD's 1/2 multi will make system unstable and this is the first time AMD is using a “.5” multi (if any). I still don’t quite get the 2.3, 2.5, and 2.7ghz.
Those who wonder about HT vs. FSB, AMD uses a base speed of 200mhz and commonly been referred to as FSB (mistakenly or not). the term FSB is less confusing in the overclocker's arena than using "HT" that confuses w/ Hypertransport link which is a completely different beast.


RE: 2.7ghz? I dont get it
By johnsonx on 11/15/2006 11:46:32 AM , Rating: 2
The .5 multiplier that has been implemented so far on K8 CPU's has been a bios/motherboard hack, not sanctioned by AMD. The earlier attempts were nothing more than complete BS, as all the BIOS would do was raise or lower the FSB/HTT clock to simulate a half multiplier. I think some later attempts took advantage of partial support implemented in the CPU, but such support was not complete and not intended to be used.

There is nothing inherent about a .5 multiplier that makes a system unstable if it's implemented correctly. All of AMD's previous CPU's (K7, K6, K5) used half-step multipliers from the beginning.

By the way, the simple method to implement a .5 multiplier is to do the .5 first, then multiply by 2x the desired multiplier. In other words, if HTT is 200Mhz, and desired multiplier is 13.5 (to yield 2.7Ghz), then first divide by 2 (a clock divider is a very simple circuit, and there's at least one already in the K8 memory controller, and no doubt several more), then multiply by 27. Easy.


RE: 2.7ghz? I dont get it
By archcommus on 11/14/2006 4:21:27 PM , Rating: 2
Uhh I'm pretty sure Athlon 64's haven't had an FSB for a long time.


RE: 2.7ghz? I dont get it
By archcommus on 11/14/2006 4:22:51 PM , Rating: 2
To clarify, I thought Athlon 64's didn't use the whole FSB/multiplier system. Isn't it just an HT speed or something? I forget I haven't checked out my BIOS in a long time.


RE: 2.7ghz? I dont get it
By superunknown98 on 11/14/2006 4:26:29 PM , Rating: 2
They don't really, but from how I understand it, there is a clock from which it's final speed is multiplied. I could be wrong but I think it's 200mhz.


RE: 2.7ghz? I dont get it
By JumpingJack on 11/14/2006 9:13:46 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Uhh I'm pretty sure Athlon 64's haven't had an FSB for a long time.


He mis-spoke, he should have asked what is the base system clock, at it is 200 MHz, AMD will be using fractional 1/2 multipliers to hit these clocks.

AMD does indeed have a FSB, it is serial and is called HT and DirectConnect. Each are clocked based on the system clock just like Intel platforms.


RE: 2.7ghz? I dont get it
By xFlankerx on 11/14/2006 9:45:13 PM , Rating: 2
There's even more confusion when you hear that the base system clock's real name is the HTT, lol. Its so weird that no one even knows that HTT stands for (it has nothing to do with HT bus, afaik).


RE: 2.7ghz? I dont get it
By Yawgm0th on 11/15/2006 6:01:24 AM , Rating: 2
HyperTransport is by nature not a front side bus. It is a bus, but it is not the same thing. Hypertransport is used to directly connect the CPU to the memory controller, northbridge, and other chipsets, each with their own direct connection. A FSB is parallel by nature, as opposed to an HT connection, which is serial.

In concept, HT is simply a replacement for a FSB and is functionally the same, but it is not a form of a FSB.


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