backtop


Print 14 comment(s) - last by aoz.. on Nov 9 at 7:31 AM

FDE.2 family of notebook drives come with DriveTrust encryption

Seagate this week announced a new line of notebook hard drives that will feature DriveTrust technology, the company's name for full drive encryption. Called the Momentus FDE.2 series, the drives will feature the technology on board, meaning that no special software or other hardware piece is required. The technology is being carried to notebooks from Seagate's current family of drives called the DB35 series, which all feature DriveTrust technology. According to Seagate:

The 2.5-inch, 5,400-RPM drive's hardware-based full disc encryption delivers significantly stronger protection than traditional encryption approaches by securely performing all cryptographic operations and access control within the drive. For users, only a password is needed to self-authenticate for full drive access, while third- party enhancements enable thumbprint and smart card options for multi-factor self-authentication.


Seagate currently distributes its line of encrypted DB35 series of hard drives for manufacturers who are developing DVR products. The DB35 drives provide the content protection mechanism required to prevent users from illegally moving off recorded TV material onto a computer. Users who have FDE.2 featured notebooks can rest easily knowing that the data on the drives are entirely encrypted. Seagate however still recommends the use of regular passwords and other devices such as finger print authentication.

The new FDE.2 notebook drives will be introduced with a starting speed of 5400 RPM and Seagate expects faster drives to be out several months later. As of right now, FDE.2 drives are not yet available. Seagate noted that the drives will be introduced in the first quarter of 2007.


Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

hardware based vs software based
By saqib on 10/30/2006 11:12:32 PM , Rating: 2
Ever wondered how much overhead does software based encryption creates, see the performance impact benchmarks below:
http://www.xml-dev.com/blog/index.php?action=viewt...

The Seagate drives have a chip that performs the crypto functions, so there is essentially NO performance impact. Hardware based encryption is awesome! :-)

http://www.full-disk-encryption.net




RE: hardware based vs software based
By Goi on 10/31/2006 10:19:58 AM , Rating: 2
Yup, there are already several laptop HDDs out there that do FDE, and with hardware based solutions there's virtually no performance degradation since the chip's encryption/decryption bandwidth is an order of magnitude higher than the drive bandwidth.


"Folks that want porn can buy an Android phone." -- Steve Jobs

Related Articles
Seagate Ships 750GB Hard Drives for DVRs
September 25, 2006, 3:39 PM













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki