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Print 28 comment(s) - last by jonp.. on Oct 18 at 4:15 PM

Say hello to Intel's "3 Series"

DailyTech has stumbled across Intel’s latest roadmap that reveals the naming scheme for its upcoming Bearlake chipsets. Bearlake is Intel’s upcoming replacement for the current Broadwater 96x series of chipsets and expected to arrive in 2007. Six variants of Bearlake are expected in the form of Bearlake-Q, Bearlake-QF, Bearlake-X, Bearlake-P, Bearlake-G+ and Bearlake-G. Intel’s upcoming Bearlake series has been named the “3 Series.” On the vPro side of things, Bearlake-Q and Bearlake-QF have been named Intel Q35 and Q33 Express respectively. Consumer high end chipsets Bearlake-X and Bearlake-P will receive the Intel X38 and P35 Express names respectively while mainstream Bearlake-G+ and Bearlake-G receive the Intel G35 and G33 names.

Intel’s upcoming X38 Express chipset is expected to replace the current Intel 975X Express chipset. The X38 Express brings new features such as PCI Express 2.0 compatibility as well as two full speed PCI Express x16 slots. DDR3 1333 will be the memory standard of choice. On the premium and mainstream side of things is Intel’s G33, G35 and P35 Express chipsets. Intel’s upcoming G33 Express chipset will feature a graphics core that features Intel Clear Video Technology. Memory support on G33 Express will be limited to DDR3-1066 or DDR2-800. Front-side bus speeds of 1333 MHz are supported with the mainstream G33 Express. Stepping up a notch is the G35 Express which features a DirectX 10 compatible graphics core. G35 Express will fully support high definition content playback with HDCP protection. DDR3-1066, DDR2-800 and a 1333 MHz front-side bus are also supported. Intel’s P35 Express will be similar to G35 Express except with the integrated graphics core removed. Intel’s X38, G33, G35 and P35 will be paired with upcoming ICH9, ICH9R and ICH9DH south bridges.

Moving into 2007 are new platforms as well. The current Averill vPro professional platform will be replaced by the upcoming Weybridge Pro platform. Weybridge Pro is expected to arrive in Q3’07 and based around Intel’s Q35 Express chipset. New features to Weybridge Pro include Intel’s AMT Pro and Intel Trusted Execution Technology (TXT). Intel’s Trusted Execution Technology is new and is designed to protect sensitive information from software attacks. This is performed without compromising usability. Weybridge Pro will also support Intel’s upcoming 1333 MHz front-side bus processors as well.

Catered towards business users that don’t need advanced management capabilities is the Weybridge Fundamental platform which is expected to arrive the same time as Weybridge Pro. Weybridge Fundamental is based around Intel’s upcoming Q33 Express chipset and adds support for Intel’s AMT technology—a feature only available on Intel’s vPro platform. In addition to Intel AMT, Weybridge Fundamental will be upgraded to support 1066 MHz front-side bus processors. While there’s no platform naming, Intel will also position its 946GZ chipset with Pentium D and Pentium E1000 series processors towards the budget business user.

On the desktop side of things, Intel’s enthusiast platform retains the Extreme Platform moniker, albeit the Intel X38 Express chipset replaces the current 975X Express chipset in Q3’07. Two premium/mainstream platforms will be available this time around in the form of Salt Creek and Santa Rosa Desktop. Salt Creek is based around Intel’s upcoming Core 2 Quad Q6600 processor and existing Core 2 Duo processors. Premium Salt Creek platforms will feature Intel’s P35, G35 and X38 chipsets while mainstream platforms will feature Intel’s G33 Express chipset. Santa Rosa Desktop systems will feature Core 2 Duo T7000 series processors coupled with Intel’s GM965 or PM965 Express chipsets and essentially be a mobile on desktop platform. Intel Extreme Platform, Salt Creek and Santa Rosa Desktop platforms are all part of Intel’s Viiv multimedia platform. At the value end of things is Intel’s 946GZ Express chipset paired with Intel Pentium E1000 and Celeron 400 series processors.

Lastly is Intel’s single processor workstation platform. Current Wyloway single processor platform based around Intel’s 975X Express chipset will be replaced by the upcoming Garlow WS platform. Garlow WS  is expected to arrive Q3’07 and feature Intel’s upcoming X38 chipset with support for dual and quad-core processors.


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RE: Interesting
By FITCamaro on 10/17/2006 2:43:32 PM , Rating: 3
I'd like to go full SATA but on my current system I only have 1 unused SATA port and 2 optical drives. Comes from having 5 hard drives.

The main reason SATA optical drives really aren't coming out is because optical drives really aren't fast enough to even stress an IDE interface much less SATA. And yeah theres some issues with installing Windows using a SATA optical drive. I mean even reading/burning a DVD at 16x you're only pushing 21-22MB/s. So its not like the interface is slowing you down.


RE: Interesting
By gramboh on 10/17/2006 4:26:40 PM , Rating: 2
Agreed. But I don't want full SATA for throughput reasons, I'd like it for a few reasons

i) No IDE ribbon cables taking up tons of space. The rounded ones are slightly better but still very bulky compared to SATA (rounded also degrades performance slightly, apparently, but again non issue on optical).

ii) No IDE ports/controller chipset cluttering up mainboard, more room for more SATA ports.

iii) Slightly lower overhead configuration/device drivers and BIOS if no IDE devices on board.

If a situation ever arose where I needed an IDE port for an older hard drive to get data off, I would probably buy a $20 PCI IDE controller.


RE: Interesting
By JeffDM on 10/17/2006 11:06:53 PM , Rating: 2
If a situation ever arose where I needed an IDE port for an older hard drive to get data off, I would probably buy a $20 PCI IDE controller.

Really, you would just get an old external enclosure. They are better for temporary stuff like that anyway.

I think board makers would love to get rid of the PCI slots about as much as you would like to be rid of IDE.

For now, I don't think it's that practical because there isn't much of a variety of SATA optical drives. They are available, but just choosing SATA narrows down your options significantly. I really don't understand why they are so rare. I'm not swayed by the whole airflow argument, it just seems odd that there are so few that use a three year old connector standard.


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