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Print 56 comment(s) - last by Zoomer.. on Oct 15 at 10:41 AM

Hybrid players due early next year

With no foreseeable happy ending to the HD-DVD/Blu-ray format war, NEC has done us all a favor today by shipping a chip that is compatible with both formats.

According to Reuters, "the chips go on sale for 10,000 yen ($84), roughly the same price as NEC Electronics' chips which read only Blu-ray or only HD DVD formats." Players incorporating the new chip will be available sometime early 2007, reports AkibaNews.

While we now have silicon to rule both formats, the optical pick-up lens capable of reading both HD-DVD and Blu-ray is still currently in development. Until such a hybrid pick-up becomes reality, dual-players must utilize two separate lenses, which no doubt drives up costs.

A NEC spokesperson commented that a hybrid chip and optical pick-up would likely make up more than half of the cost of a player.

Developments to bridge the gap between the two warring formats isn't exclusive to hardware. Warner recently filed a patent outlining plans of a hybrid-disc that will be compatible with both HD-DVD and Blu-ray by means of layering one format on top of the other.



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RE: oh please
By probedb on 10/11/2006 6:06:36 AM , Rating: 2
You also missed that most BR audio formats are standard DD, while HD-DVD gets DD+, TrueHD etc.


RE: oh please
By r0y on 10/11/2006 6:59:59 AM , Rating: 1
From wikipedia, original source is included:

"For audio, BD-ROM players are required to support Dolby Digital AC-3, DTS, and linear PCM (up to 7.1 channels). Dolby Digital Plus, and lossless formats Dolby TrueHD and DTS HD are player optional. BD-ROM titles must use one of mandatory audiotracks for the primary soundtrack (linear PCM 5.1, Dolby Digital 5.1 or DTS 5.1.). A secondary audiotrack, if present, may use any of the mandatory or optional codecs.[8] For lossless audio in movies in the PCM, Dolby TrueHD or DTS-HD formats, Blu-ray Discs support encoding in up to 24-bit/192 kHz for up to six channels, or up to eight channels of up to 24-bit/96 kHz encoding.[9] For reference, even new big-budget Hollywood films are mastered in only 24-bit/48 kHz, with 16-bit/48 kHz being common for ordinary films."
http://www.blu-raydisc.com/assets/downloadablefile...

So I think you are mistaken.


RE: oh please
By zombiexl on 10/11/2006 8:42:58 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
by r0y on October 11, 2006 at 6:59 AM
....
So I think you are mistaken.


Actually the poster made the comment that MOST are DD. This wikipedia thing does not dispute that at all. It actually shows that they are only required to support DD, DTS and PCM 5.1 and that lossless is optional.

While I dont know for sure how this differs from HD-DVD's requirements (because honestly I dont care) it is you who is wrong. Next time you may want to read the wiki before you post something that refutes your own point.



RE: oh please
By NainoKami on 10/11/2006 9:11:20 AM , Rating: 2
Just a note: PCM is lossless as it isn't compressed at all.

And for comparison with the earlier post (and really as a reply to it) about blu-ray, here is the info about HD-DVD from wikipedia (emphasis is mine):
"HD DVD can be mastered with up to 7.1 channel surround sound using the linear (uncompressed) PCM, Dolby Digital and DTS formats also used on DVDs. In addition, it also supports Dolby Digital Plus and the lossless formats Dolby TrueHD and DTS HD. Currently, most DVD movies are made with 5.1 channels of surround sound. There are relatively few titles that offer 6.1 channels of surround sound. On HD DVD the Dolby formats are mandatory, meaning that a Dolby Digital or Dolby Digital Plus track may be used as the sole soundtrack on a disc , because every player will have a decoder that can process any of these bitstreams.[6] For lossless audio in movies in the PCM, Dolby TrueHD or DTS-HD formats, HD DVD discs support encoding in up to 24-bit/192 kHz for two channels, or up to eight channels of up to 24-bit/96 kHz encoding.[7] For reference, even new big-budget Hollywood films are mastered in only 24-bit/48 kHz, with 16-bit/48 kHz being common for ordinary films."

This in my eyes looks like they are quite equal in the audio department because they both have the option of only including the "good old" Dolby Digital (AC3), which is lossy as hell.


RE: oh please
By EclipsedAurora on 10/11/2006 2:00:36 PM , Rating: 2
Please shut up and stop misleading the public.

Most BD titles offers 8 channel UNCOMPRESSED 24bit/96KHz audio track, another feature that can't be realized in crappie HD-DVD format


RE: oh please
By Trisped on 10/11/2006 2:10:25 PM , Rating: 2
Thats funny, I remember reading an article on DailyTech that said they had bumbed up the supported codecs to 8.1. Not sure what the sample rate was, but 24bit/96KHz seems to be the bottom line as of late.

And no, just like less then 50% of ALL DVDs support 5.1, the same is true of 7.1 on new formats. Yes, I think they all require 5.1 min now, but most tv shows (all that I know of) are stereo or mono, so they get no boost with 5.1 Many Movies don't seem to be getting the full 5.1 treatment either. Unless they are targeted at the HT enthusist, why waste the money?


RE: oh please
By NainoKami on 10/11/2006 9:15:46 AM , Rating: 2
You are truly mistaken as HD-DVD does not get DD+ by default. They share pretty much the same "limitation"/"options".

From wikipedia (emphasis is mine):
HD DVD can be mastered with up to 7.1 channel surround sound using the linear (uncompressed) PCM, Dolby Digital and DTS formats also used on DVDs. In addition, it also supports Dolby Digital Plus and the lossless formats Dolby TrueHD and DTS HD. Currently, most DVD movies are made with 5.1 channels of surround sound. There are relatively few titles that offer 6.1 channels of surround sound. On HD DVD the Dolby formats are mandatory, meaning that a Dolby Digital or Dolby Digital Plus track may be used as the sole soundtrack on a disc , because every player will have a decoder that can process any of these bitstreams.[6] For lossless audio in movies in the PCM, Dolby TrueHD or DTS-HD formats, HD DVD discs support encoding in up to 24-bit/192 kHz for two channels, or up to eight channels of up to 24-bit/96 kHz encoding.[7] For reference, even new big-budget Hollywood films are mastered in only 24-bit/48 kHz, with 16-bit/48 kHz being common for ordinary films.


RE: oh please
By EclipsedAurora on 10/11/2006 2:01:52 PM , Rating: 2
Please shut up and stop misleading the public.

Most BD titles offers 8 channel UNCOMPRESSED 24bit/96KHz audio track, another feature that can't be realized in crappie HD-DVD format


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