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DirectX 10 compliant GeForce 8800GTX and 8800GTS headed your way

DailyTech's hands-on with the GeForce 8800 series continues with more information about the GPU and the retail boards. The new NVIDIA graphics architecture will be fully compatible with Microsoft’s upcoming DirectX 10 API with support for shader model 4.0, and represents the company's 8th generation GPU in the GeForce family.

NVIDIA has code-named G80 based products as the GeForce 8800 series. While the 7900 and 7800 series launched with GT and GTX suffixes, G80 will do away with the GT suffix. Instead, NVIDIA has revived the GTS suffix for its second fastest graphics product—a suffix that hasn’t been used since the GeForce 2 days.

NVIDIA’s GeForce 8800GTX will be the flagship product. The core clock will be factory clocked at 575 MHz. All GeForce 8800GTX cards will be equipped with 768MB of GDDR3 memory, to be clocked at 900 MHz. The GeForce 8800GTX  will also have a 384-bit memory interface and deliver 86GB/second of memory bandwidth. GeForce 8800GTX graphics cards are equipped with 128 unified shaders clocked at 1350 MHz. The theoretical texture fill-rate is around 38.4 billion pixels per second.

Slotted right below the GeForce 8800GTX is the slightly cut-down GeForce 8800GTS. These graphics cards will have a G80 GPU clocked at a slower 500 MHz. The memory configuration for GeForce 8800GTS cards slightly differ from the GeForce 8800GTX. GeForce 8800GTS cards will be equipped with 640MB of GDDR3 graphics memory clocked at 900 MHz. The memory interface is reduced to 320-bit and overall memory bandwidth is 64GB/second. There will be fewer unified shaders with GeForce 8800GTS graphics cards. 96 unified shaders clocked at 1200 MHz are available on GeForce 8800GTS graphics cards.

Additionally GeForce 8800GTX and 8800GTS products are HDCP compliant with support for dual dual-link DVI, VIVO and HDTV outputs. All cards will have dual-slot coolers too.  Expect GeForce 8800GTX and 8800GTS products to launch the second week of November 2006. This will be a hard launch as most manufacturers should have boards ready now.

Power requirements for the G80 were detailed in an earlier DailyTech article.


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RE: Typo
By KristopherKubicki (blog) on 10/5/2006 1:05:16 AM , Rating: 3
NVIDIA defines the 8800GTX with 128 "stream processors." Each shader has a clock of 1350MHz, but the core clock is 575MHz. We will detail more on the architecture later today.


RE: Typo
By soydios on 10/5/2006 1:30:25 AM , Rating: 3
128 individual shaders, or even partial shaders, is still impressive. We're awaiting more details on this with bated breath.

Thanks for the info.


RE: Typo
By therealnickdanger on 10/5/2006 8:22:46 AM , Rating: 2
Yeah, this seems to be too amazing for my brain this early in the morning. I knew DX10 would bring some interesting improvements, but this is nucking futs! I am salivating, I'm not saying it to be funny. I actually dribbled on myself. I can't wait to see benchies along with the new R600. As someone else said below, I'll probably wait for a die shrink refresh before buying one...

Awesome.


RE: Typo
By Sunbird on 10/5/2006 2:40:25 AM , Rating: 1
So I guess we will find out about the number of pixel pipes later on?


RE: Typo
By Shining Arcanine on 10/5/2006 4:59:54 PM , Rating: 2
There are no pixel pipelines. DirectX 10 graphics cards only have unified shader pipelines, which do pixel, vertex and geometry processing, in whatever proportion is required by a game on demand.


RE: Typo
By oddity21 on 10/5/2006 4:01:31 AM , Rating: 2
Can't wait for the architecture details. The specs posted here show that these cards are unlike anything we've ever seen.


RE: Typo
By Rolphus on 10/5/2006 4:49:05 AM , Rating: 4
I'm guessing (and I could well be wrong), that 128 stream processors means it can process 32 vec4, or 43-ish (well, 42 and two-thirds) vec3 instructions per clock. That would make sense to me in terms of not insanely increasing transistor count but still providing a huge boost in the flexibility of the pipeline itself.

Interesting if that's the case - moving away from an SIMD sort of approach isn't something I expected.


RE: Typo
By Narutoyasha76 on 10/5/06, Rating: 0
RE: Typo
By akugami on 10/5/06, Rating: 0
"And boy have we patented it!" -- Steve Jobs, Macworld 2007

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