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Intel documents reveal two quad-core processors within the next six months

For those of you who hadn't seen this coming -- you should have -- Intel's desktop quad-core "Core 2" processor is on the way.  Intel's most recent launch update claims the chip will come in two iterations, the first of which will be here in November 2006.  Both chips have Socket 775 packaging and utilize a 1066MHz front-side bus.

The Extreme Edition 2.66GHz chip, dubbed Core 2 Extreme QX6700, is poised to launch this year in November.  Like other "Extreme" chips from Intel, the estimated price tag is $999 for the new processor. The CPU is compatible with all second-generation Conroe-compatible Intel 975X motherboards, but not all "965" series motherboards. Unfortunately, there are no more details on which motherboards are compatible yet.

A mainstream quad-core Kentsfield will launch early next year, dubbed the Core 2 Quadro Q6600, and will debut with a 2.4GHz core frequency.  A price tag for the Q6600 has not been set yet, but the processor will retail for less than the QX6700 but more than the Core 2 Duo E6700.  The E6700 has a street price of approximately $530 USD, but price cuts will bring the cost of the CPU down before the Q1'07 launch of mainstream Kentsfield.

Intel's original launch scheduled claimed that only the Q6600 would launch next year.  This has been revised several times by Intel representatives who have publically pre-empted AMD's quad-core plans.  AMD retaliated earlier this year stating that quad-core demonstrations would come before the end of the year. Given that AMD has a traditional habit of demonstrating its new processor technology during the Intel Developer Forums (IDF) that occur twice annum, it's quite likely that we will see these first demonstrations at next week's IDF.

A server version of Kentsfield, dubbed Clovertown, is also expected to ship this year with Socket 771 packaging.


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RE: Vista
By symbolset on 10/12/2006 1:54:54 AM , Rating: 2
What benefits from multicore? Who runs just one app at a time is a better question. It's about responsiveness.

Most video rendering sofware. Blender. DVD Burning. CD burning. IE. Pro-E. Autocad. What, don't you post youtube? How do you do that while you're strolling around in WoW? Don't lag or your BF2 1LT will get fragged.

These are all going to see grand responsiveness improvements with multicore and the more cores the better. Who wants to wait for their video to render before they can burn a CD, listen to Internet radio, browse the net or all three? Who wants a Moment of Silence in their DVD just because a system event (BTW, what's up with that?) just kicked in?

Some of us like to do stuff while our computers are doing other stuff. Multitasking on a single core just ain't what it's supposed to be and judging by the resources it consumes Vista isn't going to help. Try it. You can play games while you're recording TV and watching a different channel and burning a DVD, and your teamspeak is crystal. All this and the whole time _quiet_ because it's just not getting hot tho the fan's a gentle breeze and not the leaf blower you're used to. You'll never go back.

About the money -- the cost is fading fast as they're retiring old procs much faster than they used to. Two cores cost less than one did just a little while ago. '386 servers used to cost $10,000. Pick your comfort point and go for it. If next year they're more and faster, upgrade. It's not like the new high end procs don't fit in the same 975X motherboard that hosts last year's P4. If you gotta get a low-end CPU today, those cool new procs will slide right in when their descending price hits your rising price point sweet spot.



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