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Seagate plans to triple areal densities within two years

At the IDEMA DISKON show in Santa Clara, California, Seagate demonstrated a magnetic recording device with a whopping 421 Gbits per square inch density.  To put that in perspective, the company recently announced 160GB 5400.3 2.5" perpendicular notebook drives that have an areal density of 135 Gbits per square inch. Toshiba, the current commercial density leaders, recently demonstrated 2.5" hard drives with areal densities of 188 Gbits per square inch.

Seagate CEO Bill Watkins claims "Breakthroughs in areal density are enabling the digital revolution and clearly indicate that hard drives can sustain their advantage to meet the world's insatiable demand for storage across a wide range of market segments."

According to the press release put out by Seagate, the company claims a 1.8" disk drive produced on the same 421 Gbits per square inch technology would result in a 275GB hard drive. 2.5" drives on the density would level out around 500GB, and fully fledged 3.5" hard drives would be able to house a density of 2.5 terabytes.  Perhaps even more exciting is that Seagate "anticipates that solutions at these density levels could begin to emerge in 2009."

The leap to such densities would result in a three-fold increase of current areal densities. However, Seagate isn't alone in this race.  Earlier this year Hitachi put out a press release claiming we would see 1TB holographic drives from the company before the end of the year.  However, both companies use Komag as the primary supplier of their high density platters -- and it should not be a surprise if we see 1TB hard disk drives as well.



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RE: That's great!
By tuteja1986 on 9/16/2006 10:36:06 AM , Rating: -1
Hard drive rate of advancement has is in a frezee stop gap ;( sad to see we can't advance in hard drive front until 2009. We need a new solution.

We had the 500GB Hard drive when the 1st dual core cup came out in public market and now we are approaching Quad Core and Octo Core by 2009.

The hard drive industry is still stuck at 750GB and nothing to see a change untill 2009... ashame


RE: That's great!
By retrospooty on 9/16/2006 10:41:55 AM , Rating: 2
uuuhhhh what are you talking about?

You make it sound like we will have to be stuck on 750gb drives for the next 2 1/2 years and suddenly they will release a 2.5TB drive. It will be incremental. We will have 1tb drives within 6 months, and climbing steady as always to 2.5tb and beyond.


RE: That's great!
By s12033722 on 9/16/2006 3:58:17 PM , Rating: 3
The earlier poster pointed out your seeming incomprehension of the fact that there will be gradual improvement until 2009, but on top of that fact...

Do you realize we are talking about a 3x improvement in 3 years? Do you expect CPUs or memory to triple in speed in that timeframe? I certainly don't. Video might, since they have been on a pretty impressive ramp since time immemorial, but most technology can't even come close to that rate of progress.

Think before you speak.


RE: That's great!
By Rookierookie on 9/18/2006 10:45:54 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Do you realize we are talking about a 3x improvement in 3 years? Do you expect CPUs or memory to triple in speed in that timeframe?

3 years ago, the top CPUs were P4EE 3.2GHz/A64 FX-51s.
Today, the top CPUs are 2.93GHz Core 2 Duos.
I would say that sounds like a triple to me.


RE: That's great!
By Rookierookie on 9/18/2006 10:46:12 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Do you realize we are talking about a 3x improvement in 3 years? Do you expect CPUs or memory to triple in speed in that timeframe?

3 years ago, the top CPUs were P4EE 3.2GHz/A64 FX-51s.
Today, the top CPUs are 2.93GHz Core 2 Duos.
I would say that sounds like a triple to me.


RE: That's great!
By lewisc on 9/19/2006 4:38:17 PM , Rating: 2
Hmm yeah, well according to Moore's Law, with CPU transistor density doubling every 24 months, and if you assume that chip manufacturers are not necessarily just cramming more transistors in, but also making them run more effeciently, a tripling in power isn't wholy unobtainable.


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