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Orion Crew Exploratin Vehicle - Image courtesy NASA

Orion Logo - Image courtesy collectSPACE.com
Project Orion will land Americans back on the moon by 2020

NASA made officially announced the name of its moon vehicle yesterday -- a week ahead of schedule. The reason for the early reveal was because an American astronaut on the international space station let the name slip over an open radio channel. "We've been calling it the crew exploration vehicle for several years, but today it has a name... Orion," said astronaut Jeffrey Williams. NASA officials denied the Orion name shortly after the leak, but later confirmed the name.

It should be noted that the name "Orion" will be the official project name for NASA's missions to the international space station and to the moon. Orion will also be the name of the four-man crew exploration vehicle (reminiscent of the old Apollo capsule). The Orion capsule is 16.5 feet in diameter and has a mass of 25 tons. It also has 2.5 the internal volume of the old Apollo capsules.

"Many of its stars have been used for navigation and guided explorers to new worlds for centuries. Our team, and all of NASA - and, I believe, our country - grows more excited with every step forward this program takes. The future for space exploration is coming quickly," said Orion Project Manager Skip Hatfield.

Orion will succeed the space shuttle as NASA's primary astronaut ferry and its first flight will take place before 2014. Orion's first trip to the moon should take place no later than 2020. If Orion does touchdown on the moon by 2020, it would represent a 50 year spread since the first time an American stepped foot on our nearest neighbor in space.



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RE: Back?
By rushfan2006 on 8/28/2006 8:35:00 AM , Rating: 2
What standard is this based on? Is this a "six degrees of separation" kind of think -- in relation to NASA employees or something? For one I'm 100% sure the breakthrough that is the Communications satellite wasn't invented by NASA....and I'm nearly 90% sure NASA didn't invent the transistor as well or Teflon (wasn't that DuPont?).

Sure all three of those things may have had TESTING done by space program projects...but its kind of tacky to outright say the space program was responsible for them...fact is those products would STILL exist even w/o NASA...





RE: Back?
By Viditor on 8/28/2006 10:06:10 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
For one I'm 100% sure the breakthrough that is the Communications satellite wasn't invented by NASA


Satellites ARE the space program (or did you think we used a big rubberband to get them up there)? :)
Teflon was developed for the waste disposal systems, and transistors were invented directly under a NASA contract...
As to the transistor, I was wrong...it was mass-produced Integrated Circuits that were developed under contract for NASA.


RE: Back?
By Viditor on 8/28/2006 10:07:23 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
and transistors were invented directly under a NASA contract

Ooops...strike that


RE: Back?
By rushfan2006 on 8/28/2006 11:53:01 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Satellites ARE the space program (or did you think we used a big rubberband to get them up there)? :)


Wow you love bending words to make them sound like facts don't you....

You are talking about products as if they were INVENTED by NASA, but really you are talking about how NASA used them and/or (in the case of satellites) were responsible for their wide spread useage. The reply you gave mine exactly underscored my whole point to you in the first place ! LOL.

All I'm saying is clarify your point...NASA/The Space Program is NOT the reason these products were invented.

The Comm Sat was invented by Arthur C. Clarke and considering it was 1945 and he was at that time an RAF electronics officer and member of the British Interplanetary Society at the time he wrote the article first proposing the concept of manned satellites in 24 hour orbits high above the world...I don't think NASA was even on his mind.

As for Teflon that you again bend words in saying it was invented for the space program. It was first discovered in 1938 by Dr. Roy Plunkett at the DuPont research laboratories (Jackson Laboratory in New Jersey). Its scientific name, PTFE or polytetrafluoroethylene, it wasn't until 1945 that it was first marketed under the Dupont trademark of Teflon.

Correct my history, but I don't think the US had a space program in 1945, let alone 1938.


RE: Back?
By Viditor on 8/29/2006 1:38:37 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
You are talking about products as if they were INVENTED by NASA

No I'm not (I think you are just twisting it that way...).
It was the contracts for NASA that produced them, just as any major corporation that hires an R&D team for a project is responsible for the development of that discovery...

quote:
All I'm saying is clarify your point...NASA/The Space Program is NOT the reason these products were invented

In our capitalistic society, making great inventions and discoveries is done as a process.
First the concept. This is usually inspired by an incentive or a goal (in this case it was the goal of pure discovery from JFK's mandate).

Second the R&D is funded by a financially robust group, either a corporation/investor, or in this case by the American people through a non-profit organization.

Third, exploitation...with a company, they reap the rewards directly. In the case of the Space Program, the discoveries made in attaining the goal were passed on to US businesses.

Without the backing of NASA, most all of these discoveries would not have had the backing to be developed, hence they would still be on the drawing board (or possibly developed by another country).

quote:
The Comm Sat was invented by Arthur C. Clarke

No, the Comm Sat was CONCEIVED by Dr. Clarke...just as the helicopter was conceived by Leonardo Da Vinci. I don't think we can credit either one of them (no matter how brilliant their concepts were) with the creation of the actual product.

quote:
As for Teflon that you again bend words in saying it was invented for the space program. It was first discovered in 1938 by Dr. Roy Plunkett at the DuPont research laboratories (Jackson Laboratory in New Jersey). Its scientific name, PTFE or polytetrafluoroethylene, it wasn't until 1945 that it was first marketed under the Dupont trademark of Teflon


I was referring to FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene) Teflon, which is used for clothing and on the toilet system (as they are flexible tubes). It would hardly make sense to use PTFE in this application...


RE: Back?
By rushfan2006 on 8/30/2006 11:18:49 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
No, the Comm Sat was CONCEIVED by Dr. Clarke...just as the helicopter was conceived by Leonardo Da Vinci. I don't think we can credit either one of them (no matter how brilliant their concepts were) with the creation of the actual product.


The Comm sat wasn't developed or conceived by NASA, you are correct that Dr. Clarke is more correctly stated as the "conceiver" but my only point to begin with is still valid -- which is NASA wasn't responsible for the first sat. It wasn't hard for me to find that information either, which is why I'm a little shocked that you state otherwise.

quote:
It was the contracts for NASA that produced them, just as any major corporation that hires an R&D team for a project is responsible for the development of that discovery...


You are wrong sir, I'm not going to go back and forth for eternity with you here however I couldn't let false information stand. NASA contracts had nothing to do with the creation of either Teflon (OF ANY FLAVOR btw), the sat (as above), or transistors (which I know you corrected yourself on already, just putting it here for my point)..that's three things on your list that you state rather plainly so how can you say that's not what you meant, that you claim where direct results of NASA contracts that is dead wrong...PERIOD.

PFE teflon was not SOLELY used by NASA and NASA was not the first user of it -- so then how could a contract by NASA be responsible for its creation? Likewise the same goes for the satellite, how can a company (agency actually) who didn't have anything to do with the first one's production be credited with "Well it was NASA contracts that made it happen"....that's just absurd. That's what I mean...NASA played major rules with getting the sats UP THERE...and I never denied that part....but don't say their contracts made it possible for these things.

Your point was understood by me though, believe it or not I AGREE WITH YOU. The space program is critically important for the research and development of products, medicines and just the pure discovery of knowledge that can only be had with a space program......

But just like I can't let Al Gore take credit for the Internet, I'm not gonna let someone else give credit to someone/or some other organization for the creation of something that they don't deserve cred for.

It's that simple...I'm not in a contest or anything with you, just merely pointing out the facts of history nothing more, nothing less.


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