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Print 22 comment(s) - last by hstewarth.. on Aug 20 at 11:22 AM

"Merom" runs hot, "Yonah" might be the better chip for notebooks

Intel began releasing specifications of the new Merom processor to its motherboard partners today.  For those expecting Merom to increase performance over Yonah while simultaneously decreasing the thermal envelope, think again.

The top of the line Yonah processor, the T2700, has a TDP of 31W at 2.33GHz clock frequency.  All Core 2 Duo Merom processors have a TDP of 34W, including the lowly 1.66GHz T5500.  In comparison, the 1.66GHz Yonah rings in at 27W. 

Surely with Enhanced Speed Step these numbers get better, we'd think.  In "Battery Mode," all Merom processors clock down to 1GHz and 0.75V -- yet amazingly the TDP is still 20W.  Yonah, which also clocks down to 1GHz in Battery Mode with a 0.95V core has a TDP of 13.1W. 

Those expecting to pop in a Core 2 Duo Merom processor to alleviate an overheating MacBook Pro, look not here.  Merom is a better performing processor than Yonah, but its thermals on paper show its advantages are only in performance and not in thermals at all. 

Intel will counter these poor thermals with more "Low Voltage" and "Ultra Low Voltage" processors.  Just a few weeks ago, Intel announced an Ultra-Low Voltage (ULV) Yonah processor running on a TDP of just 9W.  Intel's newest roadmap includes the U7500, an ultra-low voltage version of Merom.  However, given the fact that the normal voltage Yonahs have a lower TDP than the average Merom processor, we'd be hard pressed to think U7500 could possibly run cooler than its Yonah predecessor.


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RE: Not again...
By KristopherKubicki (blog) on 8/17/2006 3:07:41 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
TDP does not state how much power a CPU dissipates.
quote:

TDP is the measurement of how much heat a CPU can dissapate at a maximum. The power consumption of these CPUs is less than 1.1W, at least according to Intel's roadmap.


RE: Not again...
By MercenaryForHire on 8/18/2006 10:01:28 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
The processor’s power is specified as Thermal Design Power (TDP) for thermal solution design. TDP is defined as the worst-case power dissipated by the processor while executing publicly available software under normal operating conditions, at nominal voltages that meet the load line specifications. The TDP definition is synonymous with the Thermal Design Power (typical) specification referred to in previous Intel datasheets. The Intel TDP specification is a recommended design point and is not representative of the absolute maximum power the processor may dissipate under worst case conditions.


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