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Hollow microfibres will seep liquid adhesive if a puncture occures - Coutesy of ESA
Spaceships are expensive and hard to repair - the ESA is working on programs to have spacecraft "heal" themselves

Researchers at the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Bristol, as a part of the ESA's General Studies Programme, may have made a step in the right direction towards the possibility of a self-healing spacecraft.  The researchers apparently got the idea from how human skin heals itself:

When we cut ourselves we don't have to glue ourselves back together, instead we have a self-healing mechanism. Our blood hardens to form a protective seal for new skin to form underneath.
 
This was done by replacing a small percent of the fibres running through a resinous composite material with hollow fibres that contain adhesive materials.  One of the advantages of a self-healing spacecraft is that it is more likely that NASA could launch longer duration space missions.







"The Space Elevator will be built about 50 years after everyone stops laughing" -- Sir Arthur C. Clarke




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