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The Samsung Galaxy Note 7 was an excellent smartphone, but because of its battery issues, it will go down in history as the worst smartphone to date. Samsung did a worldwide recall of its Galaxy Note 7 about a month ago on September 9th and started a replacement program which was supposed to allow customers to swap out their Galaxy Note 7 smartphones for a replacement. Now Samsung admits that the replacement units are unsafe too.

All carriers and retail partners have halted sales of the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 as reports continue to surface of battery issues. The following reports have surfaced involving the Galaxy Note7:
 
1.    A replacement Galaxy Note 7 caught fire on a parked Southwest Flight, causing the place to be evacuated.

Photo Source: Brian Green
 
 
2.    In Kentucky, a replacement Galaxy Note 7 filled a bedroom in with smoke causing the owner to have to go to the hospital.

Photo Source: Video WKYT
 
 
3.    In Minnesota, another replacement Galaxy Note 7 melted a 13-year-old girl’s on the hand.

Photo Source: KSTP.com
 
 
4.    In Taiwan, a replacement Galaxy Note 7 exploded in Taiwan while inside a woman’s pants pocket.

Photo Source: Sammobile
 
 
 
5.    At a baseball stadium in South Korea, a replacement Galaxy Note 7 caught fire.

Photo Source: Video Youtube
 
 
As a result of these and other battery recharging issues with the new Galaxy Note 7, Samsung has issued a recall of the replacement Galaxy Note7s. To be clear, you are to return the first Galaxy Note7 if you still have it, or if you have returned it and got the replacement Galaxy Note7, then you need to return that too. 
 
Here is the direct statement from Samsung’s website:

Latest Updates on the Galaxy Note7
“Samsung is working with the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to investigate the recently reported cases involving the Galaxy Note7. While the investigation is taking place, Samsung is asking all carrier and retail partners here and around the globe to stop sales and exchanges of the Galaxy Note7.

Since the affected devices can overheat and pose a safety risk, we are asking consumers with an original Galaxy Note7 or a replacement Galaxy Note7 to power it down and contact the carrier or retail outlet where you purchased your Galaxy Note7.

If you bought your Galaxy Note7 from Samsung.com or have questions, you should contact us at 1-844-365-6197 and we can help you.”

 



 

Sources: Ars Technica, BGR, Sammobile, WKYT





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