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1P Intel Server Boards

DailyTech previously reported Intel was readying LGA775 based Xeon processors for single processor servers and workstations. The Xeon 3000 series of processors were expected to mate up with Intel’s upcoming Mukilteo 2 3000 and Mukilteo 2P 3010 chipsets. Intel’s latest Q3 2006 product matrix brochure unveils details of upcoming Intel server boards based on the Intel 3000 server chipset.

Three Intel 3000 based server boards will be available—S3000AHLX, S3000AHLC and S3000AHV. Intel Server Boards S3000AHLX and S3000AH will support one dual-core Intel Xeon 3000 series, Pentium D, Pentium Extreme Edition, Pentium 4 or Celeron D processor. Intel Server Boards S3000AHLX features one PCI Express x1, one PCI-X 64-bit/133 MHz, two PCI 32-bit/33 MHz and one Intel Adaptive Slot. The Intel adaptive slot supports one PCI Express x8 or one PCI-X 64-bit/133 MHz slot while the Intel Server Boards S3000AH features one PCI Express x8, one PCI Express x4, one PCI Express x1 and two PCI 32-bit/33 MHz slots.

Intel Server Boards S3000AHV is slightly different from the other two. Processor support is limited to one Intel Xeon 3000 series, Pentium D, Pentium 4 or Celeron D processor. There’s no support for Pentium Extreme Edition processors with the Intel Server Board S3000AHV.

All three boards are compatible with Xeon processors using a 1066/800 MHz front-side bus. Dual-channel DDR2-533/667 unbuffered ECC and non-ECC memory modules are supported. A maximum memory size of 8GB is supported across four DIMM slots. Other notable features include one PATA, four SATAII with RAID 0, 1 and 10 and Gigabit Ethernet. The Intel Server Boards S3000AHLX and S3000AHLC have two Intel Gigabit Ethernet ports while the S3000AHV only has one. Integrated ATI graphics with 16MB of video memory is also standard on all three boards.

Strangely the upcoming Intel 3000 based server boards do not support previously released Intel Core 2 Duo Conroe processors. Nevertheless Xeon 3000 series processors will be priced competitively with Core 2 Duo processors.


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Where's the SCSI?
By dice1111 on 8/10/2006 9:19:21 AM , Rating: 2
Odd that the don't have integrated SCSI. Is this an indication that SATA is more cost effective and is catching up in speed and redundancy? Interesting.




RE: Where's the SCSI?
By uksupramk3 on 8/10/2006 9:53:45 AM , Rating: 2
SCSI drives have always been overpriced compared to SATA and offer very little in the way of performance advantage. The only advantage i can see to SCSI, is that you can daisy-chain peripherals, but with SATA cables being so thin, is that really much of an advantage anymore?


RE: Where's the SCSI?
By masher2 (blog) on 8/10/2006 10:28:40 AM , Rating: 2
Nothing can touch 15K SCSI for enterprise-level performance. They provide a good more than "very little" advantage...if you can afford the price premium.


RE: Where's the SCSI?
By OrSin on 8/10/2006 11:03:46 AM , Rating: 2
Even 15 SCSI is not relaly that much faster for enterprise apps. The SCSI interface only shines when you have over 8 drives or when IO to the drives are very high. SO basicely large data stores with larege number of user or application reads. Mail and Database is the primary reason you would need it. For just simple file shares SATA preformance is very close for only 1/10 the money.


RE: Where's the SCSI?
By SocrPlyr on 8/10/2006 9:58:42 AM , Rating: 2
Actually very few of Intel's entry level boards have had scsi. Also, this thing has plenty of the appropriate types of slots to put in a scsi addon card. Some did have them as an option. Really the issue is that for quite some time now there has been very little advantage for your _general_ server to going to scsi from ata drives, especially with the number of chipsets supporting basic raid functionality. Several years ago a built a bunch of servers off an intel motherboard that didn't include scsi, so this is nothing new. I cannot remember the model number but it was based off the 875 chipset, but had the ability to use ECC memory modules (the chipset supported them but not all bios implemented them). As for this chipset it sounds very similar to currently available chipsets with the addition of PCI-X, so really it isn't much to write home about.


RE: Where's the SCSI?
By Giaour on 8/10/2006 11:16:44 AM , Rating: 2
the difference between SATA and SCSI is not all about the preceived performance its the MTBF ... SCSI is designed to run 24-7 where SATA is designed to run 8 hours a day / 5 days a week. Which is why SCSI is desired for servers (web / data centers / etc).

my $0.02 ...

Giaour


RE: Where's the SCSI?
By Anh Huynh on 8/10/2006 11:25:31 AM , Rating: 2
The new WD RE2 and Raptor 150s have 1.2 million MTBF's. A Seagate SCSI drive has 1.4mil so they're catching up.


RE: Where's the SCSI?
By Phynaz on 8/10/2006 1:05:29 PM , Rating: 2
MTBF has absolutly nothing to due with duty cycle, they are completly different things.


RE: Where's the SCSI?
By kobymu on 8/10/2006 2:24:14 PM , Rating: 2
"...they are completly different things."
True -
"MTBF has absolutly nothing to due with duty cycle"
- but that part is a little bit off, you can't have a MTBF without duty cycle rating, and btw WD Raptor MTBF rating is with a 100% duty cycle (according to WD).


RE: Where's the SCSI?
By JeffDM on 9/3/2006 9:27:52 PM , Rating: 2
The Raptor is basically an enterprise 10k drive with a different circuit board. That's why its MTBF and duty cycle ratings are close to that of regular enterprise drives.


RE: Where's the SCSI?
By JeffDM on 9/3/2006 9:37:36 PM , Rating: 2
I should point out that the Raptor drives, at least in the past, were priced pretty close to the U320 SCSI version.


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