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Print 33 comment(s) - last by masher2.. on Aug 7 at 9:41 PM

The RIAA has sued another P2P software company and is asking $150,000 per illegally downloaded song discovered

The RIAA has filed yet another lawsuit in its crusade against peer-to-peer file sharing networks, this time targeting the popular LimeWire network.  

In the complaint the RIAA alleges that Lime Group LLC and its associates "actively facilitating, encouraging and enticing'' its users to steal music and that the company is doing nothing to block access to copyrighted works. The RIAA further alleges that Lime Group LLC has built a business model that allows them to directly profit from piracy.

LimeWire began operating in 2000 and has since become the program of choice among P2P users as other P2P companies have shut down or changed their business models to allow legal file trading. Last year the US Supreme Court ruled that P2P companies could be sued for copyright infringement if they were found to encourage piracy when the court ruled in the Gorkster case. The RIAA is seeking damages including at least $150,000 for each illegally downloaded song.

The suit comes only days after the RIAA settled a lawsuit with Sharman Networks, the company that distributes Kazaa.  Record labels Sony BMG Music Entertainment, Vivendi Universal, Warner Music and EMI Group are behind this latest file sharing related lawsuit.  As part of "going legit," the P2P network Kazaa recently agreed to pay record labels $100M USD in a bulk settlement.


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South Park anyone?
By FITCamaro on 8/7/2006 11:05:17 AM , Rating: 2
Remember, downloading copyrighted songs means people like Britney Spears has to fly in a Gulf Stream IV instead of a Gulf Stream V. The Gulf Stream IV doesn't have a remote for its surround sound DVD system.

The artists are suffering. If things continue, they'll be forced to wait a month to buy their next multi-million dollar home. And the executives might not be able to buy the woman their cheating on their wife with a new $500,000 pair of diamond earrings until their next paycheck.




RE: South Park anyone?
By masher2 (blog) on 8/7/2006 11:10:20 AM , Rating: 2
> "downloading copyrighted songs means people like Britney Spears has to fly in a Gulf Stream IV instead of a Gulf Stream V"

The thief who jacks a Ferrrari has the same excuse-- "the guy has plenty of money, he can afford it".

I won't even point out that the majority of artists don't make millions off their works, they may not even manage to pay off the front money for their album production costs.


RE: South Park anyone?
By PrinceGaz on 8/7/2006 7:25:25 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I won't even point out that the majority of artists don't make millions off their works, they may not even manage to pay off the front money for their album production costs.


The reason for that is the greedy record-companies take almost all the money.

The best thing to do is download the music for free and make a direct donation to the artist or group in question therefore bypassing the record-company (and the RIAA who the record-companies pay).


RE: South Park anyone?
By masher2 (blog) on 8/7/2006 9:41:14 PM , Rating: 2
> "The reason for that is the greedy record-companies take almost all the money."

Primarily because those "greedy" companies spend billions to promote those artists. There's a word for an artist who hasn't been promoted by a major label...its called "starving". The only artists who have ever gotten rich off music are those who've

Record companies quite often lose money on an artist, despite receiving the lion's share of the sales receipts. In addition to promotional costs, there's the actual recording cost of the album itself. Studio time isn't cheap, and an album can easily cost $100,000 just to record. Many labels tend to "throw bread on the waters", and sign quite a few bands, most of which they lose money on, in the hopes of having a few big hits.

There are plenty of smaller, independent labels that give artists a much larger share of the pie. You don't exactly see people lining up for their contracts though. If the major labels are so "greedy", why are artists still clamoring for their services?


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