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Samsung gets plenty of love from wireless carriers

A recent survey conducted by Kantar Worldpanel ComTech has revealed some interesting trends when it comes to how Americans purchase new smartphones. First and foremost, while many of us tech geeks pride ourselves on purchasing as much of our gear online as possible, a full 64 percent of Americans actually purchase their smartphones in-store.
 
Only 24 percent purchase their smartphones online, with the rest we assume purchasing them over the phone through their carrier.
 
But what’s perhaps most interesting is what smartphones are being pushed by carriers. Kantar’s research found that 63 percent of customers that walked into a retail store to buy a new smartphone were recommended a Samsung device. What’s most interesting is that this was double the rate for Apple recommendations and nearly 10 times the rate for smartphones made by Nokia.

 
And it should come as no surprise that 59 percent of those who were nudged towards a Samsung device walked out with one. 35 percent left with an Android smartphone made by another manufacturer, and only 6 percent purchased an iPhone.
 
But Apple needs not worry about its customers straying too far from the herd. iPhone users remain incredibly loyal, with Kantar describing a “strong emotional connection with the Apple brand and its devices.”
 
Kantar adds that consumers purchasing Apple’s iPhone models are the ones doing the least amount of pre-purchase research in part due to the strength of the brand, the rabid fanbase, and high satisfaction rate with iPhone hardware.

Sources: Kantar World Panel [PDF], via BGR



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RE: WP
By StevoLincolnite on 8/9/2014 5:55:20 AM , Rating: 3
The OS support isn't entirely Microsoft's fault (This goes for iOS and Android too!).

The issue actually lies with the hardware manufacturers and the carriers.

For instance... If Microsoft releases an OS update, it needs to be sent to the phone hardware manufacturers who then verify it will work on their devices and may make a few alterations. (As in the case with the Lumia's.)

Then you have Carriers who like to add their own touches to a phone, with their own bloatware, plus may also need to make firmware alterations of their own for cellular compatibility before the latest updates are pushed out.

However, unlike iOS and Android you actually have a 3rd option with Windows Phone, that-is, developer preview, which essentially circumvents those issues.
Granted at the firmware level you still need to wait on the hardware manufacturer and/or cellular company, hence why those with Windows 8.1 Lumia's are just now being upgraded from Lumia Black to Lumia Cyan, yet the OS is still exactly the same, you just get improved performance and battery life thanks to Nokia's improved firmware.

Unfortunately it will take awhile and for a big company to change this horrible situation, Microsoft certainly doesn't have the market-share to influence the industry that's for sure.

As for app updates and availability, I've had no drama's, all the apps I would expect are pretty much there and I have never been left wanting... With one exception, my small bank doesn't have an app, so I just made a web-browser live tile linked to my bank accounts and problem solved.

I've had my Lumia 920 for a couple years now, absolutely love it, had iOS, found it limiting for my needs. - It's far to locked down with the reliance on iTunes, Small screen which hampers geocaching and GPS and most of all, can't use it with my motocross gloves when out in the sand dunes.
Android, on the other hand can fill the hardware gap, but over time, they get bogged down with pop-up adverts, alerts and generally just get slower over time with more and more apps installed that all love to run in the background.

With my Lumia though, it still feels as fast and snappy as the day I bought it, even with several dozen apps installed and fills in all my hardware requirements.

Actually got my Grandmother hooked into the Windows Phone world, iPhone was too small and hard to read due to her failing eyesight, Android confused her far to much, Windows Phone filled every requirement by being simple and easy and not once has she had to ask me for help, saving me lots of time and hassle. :P


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