backtop


Print 40 comment(s) - last by degobah77.. on Jul 4 at 12:36 PM

Microsoft's wearable device is said to be priced around $200

Well-connected Microsoft reporter Paul Thurrott has some information on the Redmond, Washington-based company's rumored entry into the burgeoning market of wearable devices. Google has its Android Wear platform, Samsung has smartwatches based on Tizen and Apple is reportedly preparing its own “iWatch,” which will reportedly be revealed this fall.
 
Microsoft’s entry into the wearables market is said to provide “smartphone-based notifications” and will work with any major smartphone platform (Window Phone, Android, iOS, etc.) without any restrictions. In addition, Thurrott says that Microsoft’s device will be more of a wristband than an actual smartwatch, although it will provide a display that shows the current time.

 
The wearable device is also said to include a plethora of sensors to measure your heart rate, calories burned, and steps taken. The information gleaned from the wearable device would also interface with such Microsoft apps/services as Bing Health and Healthvault.
 
According to Thurrott, Microsoft’s latest hardware offering will be priced around $200 and will be available in Q4.

Sources: Paul Thurrott's Supersite for Windows, U.S. Patent Office



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: LOL
By Reclaimer77 on 7/3/2014 11:06:07 AM , Rating: -1
Again, get to the basics here. Why would Google want to block Windows Phone users from Youtube? They make money when people go to Youtube! Hello?

I don't care about whatever else you're talking about. I just want to understand why people think it's logical to assume Google would want to block Windows Phone from YouTube. I dare you to make a rational argument for that practice.

Furthermore, you people have never provided any proof that this was something Google was doing out of malice or spite. Yet it's ALWAYS portrayed that way by WP fans and Google haters (you) alike. And you accuse others of being biased?

Nice conspiracy theory, but you have ZERO evidence.

quote:
The thing was, the Microsoft Youtube app was actually better than Google's own apps on iOS and Android. I know you won't believe that, but it was. It was excellent.


Of course I believe you. Why do you think I care which app was better? That has NOTHING to do with the accusation that Google just decided to go all aggro on Windows Phone users for no reason.

quote:
Even when it's 100% substantiated.


More FUD. It has NOT been substantiated even 1% that Google did anything wrong, malicious, or sought to intentionally harm Microsoft or Windows Phone users.

This was a routine conflict, that happens EVERY DAY in the software world, that was overblown and sensationalized because of the dramatic David vs. Goliath overtones. Fed by fanbois, fueled by hate.

I just want the truth. Show me that, and I'll accept it. Until you can back your story up, I really have no choice but to accept Google's explanation of the event and move on.

And frankly, I could care less that 3% of all smartphone users want to blame Google for Microsoft's horrible mobile ecosystem. The fact that Microsoft has to depend so heavily on Google services, not their own, speaks volumes about how viable Windows Phone is. YouTube belongs to Google, you don't have some god-given right to it, Microsoft.


RE: LOL
By atechfan on 7/3/2014 11:17:27 AM , Rating: 4
quote:
The fact that Microsoft has to depend so heavily on Google services, not their own, speaks volumes about how viable Windows Phone is. YouTube belongs to Google, you don't have some god-given right to it, Microsoft.


The vast majority of Google's revenues come from advertising viewed on Windows PCs. Who depends on who? Google doesn't want to start a denial of services fight with Microsoft. MS could utterly crush Google by making ad-blocking integrated into Windows and turning it on by default. Of course they wouldn't, as it would also destroy the internet as we know it, killing all websites that offer free, ad-supported content.

Well, they could, I suppose, make Bing ads exempt from the blocking, forcing everyone to switch. But the fines for that could probably keep a few failing EU countries afloat.


RE: LOL
By Reclaimer77 on 7/3/2014 11:23:01 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Google doesn't want to start a denial of services fight with Microsoft.


Of course they don't. That's what I'm saying here! Why would Google want to do this? It makes no sense.


RE: LOL
By Reclaimer77 on 7/3/2014 11:36:54 AM , Rating: 2
This is the same kind of sensationalists slant used, especially on Daily Tech, to suggest a routine conflict with one solitary publisher is "evidence" that Amazon is becoming a monopolistic troll in the e-book market.

I'm just saying...


"If they're going to pirate somebody, we want it to be us rather than somebody else." -- Microsoft Business Group President Jeff Raikes














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki