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Print 21 comment(s) - last by sprockkets.. on Jun 9 at 11:44 AM

Microblog post contradicts claims by China's state-run media

Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) and China have long had a rocky relationship over accusations of piracy.  With U.S. and Chinese relations deterioriating in the wake of the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) spying scandal and the Obama administration's decision last month to throw fuel on the fire by charging Chinese military officers in China with cyberspying, Microsoft is among the companies accused by Chinese officials as conspiring with U.S. spying.  China has banned Windows 8 from government computers and advised Chinese citizens and businesses to drop Microsoft's latest operating system.

The spat between Microsoft and China is also fueled in part by the testy debate over Windows XP.  In April, Microsoft ended support for most SKUs of the 13-year-old operating system, much to the chagrin of the Chinese government.  Currently, roughly 50 percent of Chinese computers run Windows XP, well above the global consumer average of about 25 percent.  

Windows 8 in China
Former Microsoft Windows President Steven Sinofsky announces Windows 8 at an Oct. 2012 launch event in China. [Image Source: EPA]

China wanted Microsoft to offer Chinese customers free ongoing support for Windows XP.  Microsoft refused, saying that roughly 9 in 10 Windows XP users (indicating a whopping 45 percent of total Chinese users) are running pirated copies of the operating system.

Microsoft this week took to social media to try to appeal to the Chinese people and reassure them that it was fighting attempts to spy on them.  The company wrote on its Chinese account on local Chinese-language microblogging service Weibo [translated via Neowin]:
  1. Microsoft has never assisted any government in an attack of another government or clients.
  2. Microsoft has never provided any government the authority to directly visit our products or services.
  3. Microsoft has never provided any so-called "Backdoor" into its products or services.
  4. Microsoft has never provided the data or info of our clients to the U.S. Govt. or National Security Agency.
  5. Microsoft has never concealed any requests from any government for information about its client
Only roughly 5 percent of Microsoft's revenue comes from China according to a 2011 statement by then CEO Steve Ballmer -- a shockingly low number for the world's largest electronics marketplace.  China's $9B USD market in pirated software, though, make dealing with that massive market a headache, even before you toss in spying concerns.

Sources: Microsoft [Weibo], Neowin



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Word weasels
By sprockkets on 6/9/2014 11:44:33 AM , Rating: 2
You know, Microsoft says that they don't scan the contents of your email to provide ads.

I'm going to say that again, this time with emphasis:

Microsoft says that they don't scan the contents of your email to provide ads.

That's because Microsoft, not on their website but via a PR rep for a website, says they scan the subjects of your emails for ads on your email list.

But they are counting on you to not notice that while trying to make Google look bad.

That's sneaky Microsoft.




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