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Lenovo continues to defy the downward trending market with big gains year-over-year.

For the past year, Lenovo has been the king of the global PC market, displacing longtime leaders Hewlett-Packard and Dell. Lenovo is continuing its dominance for its fiscal 2014 period (which ended in March), holding on to its No. 1 global ranking. It recorded five percent year-over-year grown in PC shipments while the overall market declined by eight percent.
 
Lenovo also made significant inroads in the U.S. market, where HP and Dell are still in first and second place. Lenovo’s strengthened PC lineup allowed it to vault past Apple to claim the third place spot for its fiscal fourth quarter (January through March 2014).
 
“The record sales and profits that we delivered last year prove that Lenovo can grow and deliver its commitments, no matter the market conditions,” said Lenovo Chairman and CEO Yuanqing Yang. “Not only did we strengthen our leading position in PCs, but we gained three points in tablets by quadrupling sales volume and became the fastest growing major smartphone company in the world.”

 
Speaking of smartphones, Lenovo sold 50 million smartphones for fiscal 2014, enough to make it the world’s fourth largest smartphone marker – it is currently the second largest smartphone maker in China. This tally will only grow once Lenovo adds in its recent acquisition of Motorola Mobility from Google.
 
As for its financial performance during fiscal 2014, Lenovo saw a 14 percent increase year-over-year (YOY) in revenue to $38.7 billion, a 27 percent increase YOY in full-year pre-tax income to $1.01 billion, and a 29 percent increase in full year earnings to $817 million.
 
“The record sales and profits that we delivered last year prove that Lenovo can grow and deliver its commitments, no matter the market conditions,” said Lenovo in a statement.

Source: Lenovo



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RE: Nice...
By tayb on 5/21/2014 3:45:27 PM , Rating: 2
It's amazing the kind of response you get from a simple suggestion to buy American. American companies might manufacture in China but the profits stay in the US. Chinese companies manufacture in China and keep their profits there as well.

China shamelessly rips off American intellectual property and then promotes protectionism by urging citizens to buy from inside their own borders. It's great for their economy because they don't have to spend the capital for research and development and all profits stay in their borders.

When you buy from a Chinese company you are transferring 100% of the purchase price from the US economy to the Chinese economy. When you buy American you are transferring maybe 1-5%.

Buy American, boost America's economy. Simple as that. That is certainly what China is doing. I don't know why people react so negatively when it is suggested that they buy American.


RE: Nice...
By Reclaimer77 on 5/21/2014 3:54:50 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
American companies might manufacture in China but the profits stay in offshore tax shelters and other holdings


Fixed that for you :)

quote:
When you buy from a Chinese company you are transferring 100% of the purchase price from the US economy to the Chinese economy.


lmao what hyperbole! 100%??

Please think about that, and get back to me.

quote:
I don't know why people react so negatively when it is suggested that they buy American


Probably because in this case, there IS no American alternative. So attacking someone for daring to buy from China is ignorant and offensive.

quote:
Buy American, boost America's economy. Simple as that.


No it's not really that simple actually. In some ways, buying from China helps the American consumer far more.

If I can buy the same product from China, for a third or half of what I could an "American" alternative, I now have MORE of my money leftover to invest in the economy.

Translation: Chinese goods allow the American consumer to leverage more buying power, because their dollar goes further.

In the end, we did it to ourselves you know. There's no body to blame but our Government for the mess we're in.


RE: Nice...
By tayb on 5/21/2014 5:18:39 PM , Rating: 2
I don't even know how this stuff makes sense in your own head. Transferring money out of the American economy to China is good because the money saved can then be spent inside the American economy??

American laptop - $400
Chinese laptop - $200

I buy the Chinese laptop and I have $200 left over to spend elsewhere to boost the US economy. Benefit to US economy is potentially $200, benefit to China is $200. That is assuming you take the leftover $200 and buy American instead of saving it. More likely is you'll spend the remaining $200 on another Chinese gadget or just save it. The real net benefit here to the US economy will be closer to $0.

I buy the American laptop and have $0 left over. Benefit to US economy is $390, benefit to China is $10.

How did this make sense in your head? You somehow managed to convince yourself that buying from China is a benefit to the US economy. Astounding.


RE: Nice...
By StevoLincolnite on 5/21/2014 5:50:45 PM , Rating: 2
I don't live in the USA or China.
So whoever gives me the best price for what I need, wins.


RE: Nice...
By Reclaimer77 on 5/21/14, Rating: 0
RE: Nice...
By Apone on 5/22/2014 1:10:39 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
You're a fucktard, you know that?


LOL!


RE: Nice...
By Apone on 5/21/2014 5:11:19 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
It's amazing the kind of response you get from a simple suggestion to buy American.


It's amazing the amount of ignorance there is from people who don't know business fundamentals or supply chain logistics considering the power of the Internet at your fingertips.

quote:
American companies might manufacture in China but the profits stay in the US.


So you've seen American companies' books and confirmed that?

quote:
Buy American, boost America's economy. Simple as that.


It's not that simple. Exactly what classifies a company as "American"? Is Toyota un-American because it's a Japanese company with a Japanese name even though it has production plants in the midwest and employs thousands of Americans? (lest we forget that Toyota is also a household name in the United States)

Is GM un-American because its Buick Regal is built in Germany?

Reclaimer77 is correct; we leverage more buying power since our dollar goes further.


RE: Nice...
By Xplorer4x4 on 5/27/2014 1:52:16 AM , Rating: 2
Interesting to note that I have family in logistics at Toyota. He claims a Toyota Camary has more American made parts in it then a Ford Crown Victoria(and I assume that's going for it's relatives in the Lincoln and Mercury line as well). The Crown Vic was pretty much the standard for every police department in the US as they were the reliable work horse cars they need unlike the old Impala's from a several years back. Our local PD dept has almost entirely phased out the Impala for Crown Vic which is now be phased out slowly for the Dodge Charger..but I am getting OT here..


RE: Nice...
By w8gaming on 5/22/2014 11:39:00 AM , Rating: 2
Actually the problem is more complicated than that, no? If you meant boost America's economy means the company will have put cash within America borders then a lot of companies actually does have cash in America and in some ways boosting the economy. However, the government is not getting a lot of tax out of this due to creative tax evasion tactics. Whether the America or even foreign companies are boosting America's economy depends on how they are using their fund and whether they put them in circulation within America to create more jobs etc. In some ways even Lenovo is creating lots of retailing jobs.

http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/tax-reform/...


"I'm an Internet expert too. It's all right to wire the industrial zone only, but there are many problems if other regions of the North are wired." -- North Korean Supreme Commander Kim Jong-il














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