backtop


Print 49 comment(s) - last by GotThumbs.. on May 22 at 12:59 PM

*115-miles maximum stated range, YMMV of course

The Germans are coming! We’ve already seen premium German automakers BMW and Mercedes-Benz bring their all-electric vehicles to the forefront with the i3 and B-Class Electric Drive, respectively. Now mainstream German automaker Volkswagen is looking to join the fun with its e-Golf.
 
The e-Golf is based on the seventh generation (MK7) Golf, which uses Volkswagen’s new modular MQB platform.

 
Compared to its German rivals, the e-Golf is down quite a bit on power. Whereas both the i3 and B-Class Electric Drive feature electric motors with at least 170hp, the e-Golf makes due with 115hp and 199 lb-ft of torque. Add in a curb weight of 3,090 lbs (compared to 2,634-lb for the i3) and you’re looking at barely adequate performance. Volkswagen says that the e-Golf will hit 60 mph in a leisurely 10 seconds and reach a top speed of 87 mph.
 
701 pounds of the e-Golf’s weight can be attributed to the lithium-ion battery pack, which is comprised of 264 individual cells. The battery pack has a total capacity of 24.2 kWh and can be charged in four hours using a 240-watt wall box, or in 20 hours using a standard household outlet.

 
Volkswagen says that the e-Golf can travel a maximum of 115 miles on a single charge. This is most likely a “when pigs fly” figure and would only be achievable in absolutely perfect conditions. The average “real world” range, however, is a more realistic 70 to 90 miles according to Volkswagen. The official EPA numbers will likely meet somewhere in the middle of that range, as the BMW i3 is EPA rated at 81 miles with its 22 kWh battery pack.
 
Volkswagen has not provided pricing information on its e-Golf yet, but we hope that the vehicle is priced more in line with the Nissan Leaf ($29,830) and Ford Focus Electric ($35,170) than the BMW i3 ($41,350) and Mercedes-Benz B-Class Electric Drive ($41,450).
 
The e-Golf will go on sale in the U.S. during the fourth quarter in “select states.”

Source: Volkswagen



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: VW still playing catchup
By Mint on 5/14/2014 11:10:24 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
There's no market for EV's. But since you continue to convince yourself EV's are ready for everyone
I never said they're for everyone, especially pure EVs.

But go look at every new technology: You ALWAYS aim for the high-end market first, then go for cost reduction to address the bigger market. Tesla success is based entirely on grabbing a big share of the $100k car market.

So why is nobody else following this blindingly obvious strategy? What's your explanation?
quote:
Uhhh exactly. Did the Government force Intel to "step their game up"? Did ARM and Qualcom get subsidies to compete with against Intel? No!
There's very few gov't forcing sales of EVs. Just the CARB states, and it amounts to a small percent. And guess what: Fuel cell vehicles are worth nine EV credits.

Subsidies are a red herring: EVERYONE can get their hands on them. It's an open competition. In what way are they an excuse for half-assed efforts?


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Reclaimer77 on 5/14/2014 11:26:14 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
So why is nobody else following this blindingly obvious strategy?


Huh?

How many $100k cars rolling around do you see on a daily basis?

Blindingly obvious strategy...lol okay. Says you.

quote:
There's very few gov't forcing sales of EVs. Just the CARB states, and it amounts to a small percent. And guess what: Fuel cell vehicles are worth nine EV credits.


Uhh CAFE?

It's IMPOSSIBLE to meet the new fleet requirements using just ICE vehicles, certainly ICE vehicles people are actually interested in buying.

To say EV's have nothing to do with Government influence is just walking with blinders on.

quote:
Subsidies are a red herring: EVERYONE can get their hands on them. It's an open competition. In what way are they an excuse for half-assed efforts?


Wow you just DO NO get this at all do you?

Saying everyone can get EV subsidies so that means everyone should be making EV's is the most simplistic, idealistic, nonsensical mentality one could possess.

quote:
I never said they're for everyone, especially pure EVs.


Oh no, you don't do that at all. You just browbeat anyone who says otherwise...


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Mint on 5/14/2014 1:27:43 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
How many $100k cars rolling around do you see on a daily basis?
Quite a few. It's got decent volumes with high margins, which is why VW group, BMW, Daimler, Toyota, and others all have a presence there with multiple vehicles. Am I to believe all these companies are idiots for investing in this segment? $100k was just an example, too, as these manufacturers didn't make EVs in the $60-90k segments either.

Rarely are engine technologies not introduced on performance cars before they trickle down. This is how technology always works if you're actually trying, as opposed to just fulfilling a PR need.
quote:
Saying everyone can get EV subsidies so that means everyone should be making EV's
Where did I say everyone should be making EVs? Huh? All I said is that it's an equal opportunity, nullifying the dumb analogy you made when saying, "Did ARM and Qualcom get subsidies to compete with against Intel?"

quote:
It's IMPOSSIBLE to meet the new fleet requirements using just ICE vehicles
WRONG:
http://green.autoblog.com/2014/01/17/mpg-cafe-stan...
54.5 CAFE is ~40 MPG real world, because for anything but a compact the actual requirement is lower. Automakers are ahead of schedule in meeting CAFE.
quote:
quote:
I never said they're for everyone, especially pure EVs.
Oh no, you don't do that at all. You just browbeat anyone who says otherwise...
All talk and zero proof. I suppose you think I browbeat myself? I've stated again and again that my guess is 10% market share for pure EVs:
http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=34814...
http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=31978...


RE: VW still playing catchup
By snhoj on 5/14/2014 7:12:15 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
But go look at every new technology: You ALWAYS aim for the high-end market first, then go for cost reduction to address the bigger market. Tesla success is based entirely on grabbing a big share of the $100k car market.

So why is nobody else following this blindingly obvious strategy? What's your explanation?


I think the VW group is sort of following that strategy though maybe not with this particular vehicle. Don't forget Porsche, Audi, Lamborghini, and Bentley are all part of the group. I personally think 10 seconds is acceptable. Range is OK for a shopping basket, errand runner, or maybe even a daily commuter. Price is unknown at this point. It’s not going to set your hair on fire but then it’s a Golf it’s not meant to.

I think Tesla licensed a lot of its initial technology for the roadster off AC propulsion and has since developed and patented its own unique take on the tech. AC propulsion has found and exploited an economic and power density sweet spot of building a large battery out of thousands of cheap commodity cells which already have the economies of scale of being produced in the tens of millions by a bunch of different manufacturers around the world in a competitive market.

Tesla is producing from the top down because they have trended the falling cost of those cells and the increasing Ah capacity and are relying on that continuing trend to meet cost and weight targets for their future models. The model S for instance has higher Ah cells that the roadster. At least I think that was their strategy in the beginning.
They are now buying so many cells that they can dictate minor changes without disrupting the economies.

You can bet that if Tesla’s battery partner had to bid for that position Tesla will be getting a very sharp price on their cells based on expected volumes. They may even be making money on other more minor contracts and just making volume on what they supply to Tesla, who knows? That happens in business sometimes where a factory will supply into a market where they just break even or even make a small loss in order to increase their production volume, which increases the utilization of plant and improves their economies of scale. They then make their money supplying into a parallel market where some factor tilts the economies in their favor such as shipping costs. It's a big bet to make and Tesla as an established player with plenty of IP to defend its position is a lot safer than any new comer. The point I'm making is that the big drops in costs for the cells at least are already in for Tesla and from now on its just tiny incremental improvements over a great deal of time.

Any way you can see from this that there are many barriers to entry and it would be extremely difficult for anyone to follow in Tesla’s footsteps.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Mint on 5/16/2014 10:58:34 AM , Rating: 2
Yup, I know about VW's pricier brands, which is why it's more shocking that they didn't see the opportunity that Musk did. They definitely have the purchasing power to not only follow in Tesla's footsteps, but they could have led.

It seems like CEO of VW recognized their gaffe, because the head of its Quattro unit was demoted for not getting a halo EV (R8 eTron) to market and giving away the segment to Tesla.

Anyway, regarding the eGolf, there are some hints to pricing, as it's only €50 less than the BMW i3. Consumers expect better than 10s 0-60 times in a $40k car. If it costs $30k before tax credit, then I'll partially retract my criticism, but it won't.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By chrnochime on 5/16/2014 3:45:52 PM , Rating: 2
Give away the segment? Ah yes comparing a 2 seater that's highly impractical and targeted at a very small part of the overall market to the Model S which plays in the crowded 70-100k luxury sedan market. Don't tell me it's practical compared to the BMW 6 and/or S class coupe. Post the same comment on Jalop or AB and you'd be laughed out. What a joke.


RE: VW still playing catchup
By Mint on 5/16/2014 5:42:25 PM , Rating: 2
My apologies for skipping a few steps in my logic. The R8 eTron would've simply been the first step, similar to the Tesla Roadster. The eTron was first unveiled in 2009, and they did demo runs at LeMans in 2010.

As it is, they're planning to release a Q8 eTron in a few years based on what they learn from the R8 eTron. The whole process could have been advanced a few years.

They're seemingly doing the right things to catch up eventually, but the eGolf still has a pathetic motor for a 2015 $40k car.


"Paying an extra $500 for a computer in this environment -- same piece of hardware -- paying $500 more to get a logo on it? I think that's a more challenging proposition for the average person than it used to be." -- Steve Ballmer














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki