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They say students lack the motor skills or can't pay attention in class because of tablet overexposure

A group of UK teachers are urging parents to limit their children's time on tablets and other technology, as they claim a rising number of young students lack the motor skills needed to play with building blocks while older students are unable to take written exams with pen and paper.

According to The Telegraph, the Association of Teachers and Lecturers wants parents to turn off the Wi-Fi at night before bed so students get a good night's sleep instead of playing on tablets all night. 

The association claims that younger students as young as three or four can swipe on an iPad screen, but have little or no dexterity in their fingers to use building blocks. 

As for the older students, the association said their attention spans are limited in the classroom due to overexposure to technology. They further claimed that these students can't implement the skills they read in their textbooks, but have exceptional technical skills when it comes to consumer electronics.  


“It is our job to make sure that the technology is being used wisely and productively and that pupils are not making backward steps and getting obsessed and exhibiting aggressive and anti-social behaviours,” said Mark Montgomery, a teacher from Northern Ireland.

“In the same way we can use a brick to either break a window or build a house, digital technology can be used for good or bad, and teachers can and should help their pupils make positive choices so they have positive experiences.”

The teachers say many children born with an iPad in their hands and overuse the devices are more likely to lack non-tech skills as simple as writing with pen and paper. 

This seems to be an issue in other parts of the world as well. Back in 2012, it was reported that children in South Korea are especially prone to internet addiction, and that the dangers of tech addiction would be taught in schools. 

In the U.S., however, tablets like the iPad are being deployed in many school districts to advance tech skills. 

Source: The Telegraph



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RE: Sod Off
By Mathos on 4/17/2014 4:40:22 PM , Rating: 2
Really?

It's more of a concern that people are literally forgetting how to write, or just never learning to do so. You can say, but they're learning to type on a computer or compose text on a tablet. But... How useful is that ability in the event of say the power grid being shut down or taken out for a long period of time? Guess what, all that fancy tech becomes worthless paperweight material without electricity.

The written word, stored on paper, stone, whatever, can last thousands of years. And at one time, the ability to read and Write, were considered privileges of the wealthy or clergy. The written word, stored on digital media, can only last as long as the power source or battery holds out.

I grew up around technology and computers. Even though I was born in the 70's. And I know all too well the effects of internet, or gaming addiction, because I've gone through it myself. You start to lose, or never develop proper social skills, etc. Because you're too busy being stuck to the game, etc. Many people tend to develop violent behaviors when they're cut off from said addictions. Recent history with school shootings and attacks anyone?

And what I'm really seeing in society lately. Is that people who get too hooked on tech, can't function without it. They almost can't survive without being plugged in. I'd say that is the real concern being put forward in this article. I see it every day, watching video game streamers. Those who didn't grow up attached to tech, are in general perfectly normal functioning human beings. But, those who did grow up plugged in, you can look at them and ask, how did you manage to even feed yourself today?


RE: Sod Off
By bah12 on 4/17/2014 4:54:21 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
It's more of a concern that people are literally forgetting how to write, or just never learning to do so. You can say, but they're learning to type on a computer or compose text on a tablet. But... How useful is that ability in the event of say the power grid being shut down or taken out for a long period of time? Guess what, all that fancy tech becomes worthless paperweight material without electricity.
Can you recompose these thoughts in hieroglyphs or possibly a cave painting? There was a time when THOSE were the way the human experience was recorded and passed down. An ancient Egyptian may look at you as illiterate for not knowing such skills. Point is your position is just as the OP stated a Luddite or technophobe. Just because the technology you grew up on is evolving, doesn't make it worth less.

And spare me your tin foil hat no power argument, same can be said for a fire a flood destroying your paper knowledge.


RE: Sod Off
By Reclaimer77 on 4/17/2014 5:12:48 PM , Rating: 2


Winning. That's what I'm saying

In a few generations something else will replace tablets and smartphones. And the previous generation will be saying "you should be using a tablet to teach your child, this (insert new thing) is causing problems!"


RE: Sod Off
By Reclaimer77 on 4/17/14, Rating: -1
RE: Sod Off
By someguy123 on 4/17/2014 10:56:58 PM , Rating: 2
What are you even talking about? This is basically the school system's attempt at notifying the parents of what they think is a disciplinary problem. They can't force parents to stop giving their kids tablets. This isn't any different from a teacher giving advice to parents during a conference. Your posts read like the teachers are petitioning a law against late night tablet usage. I don't have anything against tablets in general, but I'd like to see that era you lived in where reading was such an ingrained, popular past time among children that kids were falling asleep from "reading all night".

This actually is the teachers doing their jobs and giving parents their perspective. It's not their job to raise your child, and quite frankly its not their job to baby someone who struggles at math. They exist to help push everyone in the class forward, monitor your abilities and communicate with you and your parents. Your teachers should've contacted your parents and had you put more time into studying or suggested tutoring. It's ultimately your parents and your own responsibility to keep up or exceed everyone else.

"I just didn't get math" oh brother. You've got underachieving special snowflake written all over you.


RE: Sod Off
By Dr of crap on 4/21/2014 10:22:25 AM , Rating: 1
WRONG!
Parents should and could be helping.
IT IS NOT only up the school system to help out.

Parenting is a 24/7/365 job and we have plenty of proof out in the world of parents that shouldn't have had kids because they failed to raise the kids right.

Hope your kids are just super smart so you don't have to help them!


RE: Sod Off
By HostileEffect on 4/17/2014 5:28:19 PM , Rating: 2
It doesn't matter if I'm in the California mountains or some third world desert, I'm never without electricity unless I don't feel like packing a source. Everything is compact and light weight so getting electricity for computers during a grid failure or collapse is is a non-issue.

A lot of guys bring their phones, kindles, Ipods, etc. I used to bring 5590's with me on field ops, about ten phone charges out of one of those bricks. One member loaded up Google earth just to get the best angle on a training area we were in.

As for writing, the most writing I do is signing my name or printing. Everything is typed these days unless its a punishment, no one has the time to decipher chicken scratch or some variant of cursive writing. Bring TYPED documents or they go in the trash and you get told to fill it out again. Social skills? Disrespect someone for 'talking funny' in a professional work environment and see what that gets you.

Social media addiction is an issue though, out of about 30 computers, the one I signed out was the only one without facebook on it. More than an issue, its a disease. I live in the bushes, away from social anything. I don't use social media, its either text, call, or see them in person, depending on the level of importance and response time.

Bring hooked on tech is just the next direction of our civilization. Everything is more connected into computers than ever before and if you can't use, fix, and modify electronic components then you will be at a severe disadvantage. Traditional things are being replaced by their modern part. Books to E-books, metal to polymer, cable TV is now internet TV that you can watch nearly anywhere. I have thousands of books on my hard drive and I'll never read them all in my life time, that same amount of paper means many dead trees, more space than a house, and a fire hazard, why all of that when I can put them all and MORE on an out dated thumb drive?


RE: Sod Off
By JediJeb on 4/18/2014 2:51:35 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Bring hooked on tech is just the next direction of our civilization. Everything is more connected into computers than ever before and if you can't use, fix, and modify electronic components then you will be at a severe disadvantage. Traditional things are being replaced by their modern part. Books to E-books, metal to polymer, cable TV is now internet TV that you can watch nearly anywhere. I have thousands of books on my hard drive and I'll never read them all in my life time, that same amount of paper means many dead trees, more space than a house, and a fire hazard, why all of that when I can put them all and MORE on an out dated thumb drive?


I look at that as a positive. Just think, in a few years those of us who still know how to write cursive will be able to send messages in code that is undecipherable to the younger generation :)


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