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Print 55 comment(s) - last by EricMartello.. on May 15 at 1:55 AM

First time eDrive and xDrive tech has been combined in one vehicle

BMW has unveiled the Concept X5 eDrive, which will be showcased at the New York International Auto Show. Although the vehicle is labeled as a concept, it’s a dead ringer for the production plug-in hybrid version of BMW’s popular crossover that it plans to bring to market sometime within the next year or two.
 
The hybrid drive system gets its primary motivation from a 245hp turbocharged 4-cylinder engine. That gas engine is combined with a 95hp/184 lb-ft electric motor developed by the BMW Group. Power for the electric motor comes from a lithium-ion battery pack (which is mounted under the cargo area) that can charge from any wall outlet.
 
The Concept X5 eDrive can drive on electricity alone for up to 20 miles at speeds up to 75 mph. BMW says that the car will have an average fuel consumption of over 74.3 mpg in the EU testing cycle (which means we’ll likely see less than half of that quoted figure under EPA guidelines). BMW says that the X5 concept can reach 62mph in under 7-seconds.

 
The Concept X5 eDrive is the first from BMW that uses its xDrive all-wheel-drive system paired with eDrive hybrid technology.
 
The concept also has a ConnectedDrive system that helps plan routes and lists the location of charging stations on the GPS map. This allows the driver to find a charging station when they are around town in electric mode.

Source: BMW



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RE: Tesla!
By EricMartello on 4/14/2014 3:28:03 PM , Rating: -1
quote:
False. Torque accelerates a car; the heavier a car is, the more torque you need to reach a certain speed by a certain time. ICE engines do not produce "instant torque". When the OP says "instant torque", he/she means the tendency of electric engines to produce 100% of the torque at all RPMs. ICE engines don't do that; generally, ICE torque is 50% of the max at the lowest RPMs (generally 800-1,200) , peaks around 2,000-3,500, then drops to below 50% from 6,000 and beyond. The swing from 50%-100%-50% is what jerks the car during gear shifts up and pushes you back in the seat as you hold the gas.


It doesn't matter if they produce 100% of their torque - they still have to spin up. If the engine is at ZERO RPM then it is producing ZERO power, regardless of how much torque is being generated.

Gas and diesel engines idle, that means they're always rotating and they always have both torque and power available as soon as the transmission engages.

If the engine produces sufficient torque to move the mass of the vehicle, then you gain more by increasing the RPM while maintaining a flat torque curve. High low-end torque is really only useful if you are towing something or need to move a heavy load at low speeds, where the additional torque will assist in moving the mass.

You will not move "faster" by having more low-end torque IF the engine already produces enough torque to move the car...which means that for cars in general, you will see better results with the torque peak biased toward the upper RPM range.

Electric motors have full torque at start, but it quickly declines as RPM increases. Look at any dyno graph done on an electric motor. This is why electric motors tend to have low peak HP numbers.

quote:
Electric vehicles, producing 100% of the torque all of the time, generally lack the jerking and push back. Drivers have commented on how deceptive acceleration is in EVs since it's there, but you don't feel it. "Instant torque" makes acceleration smooth, something you can appreciate in a heavy vehicle.


A highly subjective and pointless statement to make. There is no noticeable jerking and push back in an modern vehicle with an automatic transmission...and people who opt for a manual probably like that sensation.

There is no value to having "instant torque", or full torque from start. It's yet another false "benefit" being touted to make an inferior product seem better.

quote:
The Model X isn't even in production yet. Wait until there are models on the road with recorded data before making these kinds of claims.


Let's hope it doesn't go into production until it can secure private capital and not have any taxpayer-funded kickbacks.

quote:
BTW, the OP meant the 4.4secs it's estimated to get to 60mph. That's better than many sports cars, and is comparable to some older supercars. Not bad for a car weighing more than 2,100kgs (that kind of performance is usually seen from a car weighing 1,400kgs with that amount of HP and a better aerodynamic drag coefficient).


The cars in Tesla's price range are all capable of similar or better performance. You're failing to make much of a case for the EV despite being so enthusiastic about disagreeing with me.

The fact that electric cars are bloated pigs is a BAD thing. I takes MORE energy to move a heavy vehicle than it does a lighter one. Only on DT will some nerd try to promote a heavy electric car as being superior to a lightweight gasoline car.

quote:
Which is why the OP said long EV range, as in "long for an EV." We have to see a real car in action, but the estimates are pretty good for a battery-only EV. Which invalidates the rest of your post, since Telsa doesn't create cars with gasoline generators.


Maybe try reading more carefully since you apparently think you know something you don't.

I provided the example of charging batteries with a gas powered generator to illustrate the INHERENT LACK OF EFFICIENCY that electric vehicles represent. You've been dumbed down by liberal media to equate "not using gas" with "efficient" and that is completely untrue.

If you have a 100 HP electric motor, that equals about 75 kW.

If you have a battery that can power the motor for 1 hour at full load, you would have a battery that can provide 75 kW/h. Tesla cars have a battery with 85 kW/h of capacity available.

A 240V electrical circuit provides up to 3,600 Watts at full capacity (15 amps is standard). If you want to charge an 85 kW/h battery you will draw 3.6 kW for nearly 24 hours. At today's electric rates, say 15 cents per kWh, you're looking at $12.75 per full charge...and it doesn't matter if you opt for "dual chargers" to cut the charge time in half. The amount of electricity drawn is still the same, and so is your cost.

And you think this is better than gasoline or diesel? Are you fcuking kidding me? You really believe that electric rates are not going to increase if EVs were widely adopted and everyone was charging theirs each night?

You can drive 30 miles for $3 bucks and change in a typical gas powered car.

I've invalidated you.


RE: Tesla!
By amanojaku on 4/14/2014 4:09:41 PM , Rating: 3
Considering your posts in this article, it's clear that you're not only woefully ignorant of this topic you're also fond of rambling and attacking people who don't agree with you.

If there is anyone who is reading this thread and would like to know why everyone else disagrees with Eric's comments (or finds them not worth reading) I would be more than happy to explain in greater detail. There's no point it explaining it to him since he's spouting nonsense that can be debunked by an introductory book on automotive concepts and physics.


RE: Tesla!
By EricMartello on 4/15/2014 4:13:58 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Considering your posts in this article, it's clear that you're not only woefully ignorant of this topic you're also fond of rambling and attacking people who don't agree with you.


That's right, you're not able to refute anything I said because you know it's true so resort to making a sore loser comment like this.

quote:
If there is anyone who is reading this thread and would like to know why everyone else disagrees with Eric's comments (or finds them not worth reading) I would be more than happy to explain in greater detail. There's no point it explaining it to him since he's spouting nonsense that can be debunked by an introductory book on automotive concepts and physics.


The idiot thinks he's an authority on cars, or anything for that matter. Gotta say it adds a touch of humor to this whole bit.

Electric cars didn't work in the 1800s and nothing has changed now, 214 years later. The problems they had then are largely the same as the ones they have today.


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