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  (Source: Delicious Design League)
Gogo talks about next generation of in-flight interent

Gogo was one of the first companies that got into in-flight internet connectivity. The company is now talking up its next generation services that will offer faster speeds to airline passengers thanks to new technology that will use the same low-profile antenna as the Ground to Orbit technology offers.
 
Rather than using the Air to Ground solution for the return link to the ground, the new 2Ku system will have a pair of low-profile Ku-band satellite antennas. This will allow peak data speeds of up to 70 Mbps.
 
“When we launched our in-flight Internet service five years ago, we were able to deliver peak speeds to the aircraft of 3.1 Mbps through our ATG network,” said Gogo’s president and CEO, Michael Small. “About a year ago, we began deployment of our next generation ATG-4 service, which took peak speeds to 9.8 Mbps. Our GTO solution takes the peak speed to 70 Mbps in the U.S. and 2Ku brings 70 Mbps to the rest of the world.”
 
Gogo says that the 2Ku antenna is two times more efficient spectrally than other antennas on the market. That means more bandwidth at lower costs. The small antenna is 4.5-inches tall, which helps to minimize the effects of drag on the aircraft. The antenna supports the Ku satellites in orbit now and will support future Ku satellites, including spot beam satellites.
 
Gogo says that when these future spot beam satellites are available, peak speeds will increase to 100 Mbps. Gogo's latest in-flight internet system is expected to be available in mid-2015.

Source: Gogo



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By Milliamp on 4/8/2014 3:36:56 PM , Rating: 2
I mean it, is there enough extra bandwidth in there for the plane to send those satellites the ~2 bytes of information for the location of the plane in the event some pilot shuts off the transponder and decided to take the thing for a joy ride over the Indian ocean?

It doesn't even need to be a constant stream. I'll settle for the plane letting the satellite know where its at every 15 minutes or so just so the search area for my body can be somewhere more specific than what hemisphere the plane disappeared in.

Considering the transponders that report the planes locations were shut off on 3 or the 4 9/11 planes you would think some kind of a backup system for the plane to report its location to satellite would have made someones todo list before now but I suppose not.




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