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Support for Office 2003 ends April 8 along with Windows XP

Microsoft has stepped up its efforts in recent months to kill off Windows XP for good, and those efforts are now extending to Office 2003. Office 2003 has been around for over a decade and Microsoft wants users to switch to Office 365.
 
Microsoft wrote in a blog post, "Office 2003 no longer meets the needs of the way we work, play and live today. For this reason, it is time to say farewell to Office 2003 and embrace the productivity solution of today – Office 365."
 

Microsoft wants users to ditch Office 2003

Many people have been using Office 2003 for years simply because it does all they need and it's paid for. Office 365 requires a subscription and you will need to continue paying to keep it active.
 
Microsoft says that support for Office 2003 will end on April 8.
 
We already knew that support for Windows XP would also end on April 8, and Microsoft has resorted to pop ups to tell XP users the end is here. Microsoft also offers a $100 discount to get XP users to upgrade to Windows 8. 

Source: Office



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RE: Just A Matter Of Time
By mellomonk on 3/25/2014 3:16:26 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
There is no similarity between Linux and Windows. Apple is a branch of a Linux flavor so if anyone were to be sued it would be Apple. SCO tried to sue Linux users for, supposedly, impeding on UNIX code and they crash and burned. Never heard of SCO? Get my point?

MacOS X and iOs are based on Darwin. Which in turn is based on FreeBSD, not Linux. Completely different kernel, though both are Unix-like operating systems. Apple's involvement in the open source communities is controversial for some because so much of what they do is proprietary. But they have contributed back code to FreeBSD and open source in general. For example the Webkit technologies.

SCO Group sued Unix and Linux distributors and corporate users, primarily IBM and Novell. Linux would not have been involved at all except that SCO asserted that IBM contributed back some of the code in question to the Linux kernel. Ultimately Novell prevailed in it's case dealing a huge blow to SCOs assertions. SCO still exists and is still in court with IBM.


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