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Apple hopes to lower the price of entry with the iPhone 5C by adding an 8GB variant

It was reported earlier this year that Apple’s latest current generation of smartphones have been somewhat of a mixed bag for the company. The $99, entry-level iPhone 5C (largely an iPhone 5 with a colorful plastic body) was apparently not the runaway sales success that Apple had predicted.
 
As Apple CEO Tim Cook put it, “It was the first time we ever ran that play, and demand percentage turned out to be different than we thought.”
 
Instead, most people just decided to pony up an extra $100 to get the superior-spec’d iPhone 5S with its faster A7 processor and Touch ID fingerprint scanner.


iPhone 5C
 
There is now word that Apple is looking to turn the tide by introducing a cheaper, 8GB variant of the iPhone 5C this week (the cheapest iPhone 5C currently available is equipped with 16GB of storage and is priced at $99 on contract). The only other iPhone model that Apple offers with 8GB of capacity is the nearly three-year-old iPhone 4S, which is available for free on contract. It is unknown if the 8GB iPhone 5C would replace the iPhone 4S as a “freebie” smartphone, or if it will occupy a highly plausible $49 price point.
 
The first option seems like the most likely scenario, as it would allow Apple to rid itself of smartphones using the older 30-pin dock connector (Apple’s current generation products connect are equipped with a Lightning dock connector). It would also align all of Apple’s smartphone screens to 4” – that is until the iPhone 6 hits the market later this year.

Source: Apple Insider



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RE: Contract
By Solandri on 3/17/2014 5:13:43 PM , Rating: 2
Most high yield accounts don't let you keep your cash liquid. CDs are a good example - you get the interest rate in exchange for agreeing not to withdraw the money for a certain period of time.

The other type of high yield account is a debit checking account. In exchange for the 1%-1.5% interest rate, they require you to make a dozen or so debit card transactions each month. The interest you're earning isn't paid by the bank - it's paid by the merchants you're buying from in the form of debit transaction fees. So while yes you are earning higher interest, if everyone did this, the interest you're "earning" would just be paid back to the merchants in the form of higher prices. i.e. It only works if most people don't know about it and help subsidize your merchant prices.


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