backtop


Print 19 comment(s) - last by jim davis.. on Apr 9 at 9:03 AM

The service will be available in the next 60 days

North Carolina residents are on the list for Google's Fiber deployment of super fast internet speeds, but gigabit speeds are coming sooner than previously thought -- and not via Google.

According to WRAL, North Carolina-based RST Fiber will beat Google to the punch in the Tar Heel state with the promise of gigabit internet speeds within the next 60 days. 

Aside from gigabit speeds, RST Fiber also promises a la carte TV services (rather than packages) and uncompressed video including 4K.

Privately held RST Fiber's network runs from the coast to the mountains, spanning about 3,100 miles. 

"The 5G network is here," said RST Fiber co-founder and CEO Dan Limerick. "This network will enable the Internet of Everything."

RST Fiber uses Cisco technology to operate its network, which is the creator of the term "Internet of Everything." It's defined as smart devices of all kinds (computers, phones, TVs, thermostats, etc.) having Internet connectivity and connecting people. 


To provide access to the high-speed service, RST will install Wi-Fi towers around Raleigh that have a 1.5 to 2 mile operating radius. Once within the operating range, users will simply type in a password to login and connect.  

RST Fiber will first roll out to Raleigh, with south Charlotte following over the next month. Asheville will receive service about the same time as Raleigh, and some ares of the Triangle outside of Raleigh also will be linked to RST Fiber (although it's not yet clear where). 

RST's internet service is expected to cost $99 a month, with TV and other services yet to be priced (RST is working with content providers at the moment). 

Currently, Google Fiber has data transfer speeds of 1 gigabit per second. It went live in Kansas City in 2012, starting off with 700Mbps downloads and 600Mbps uploads. 
 
In April of last year, it was reported that Google Fiber would expand to Utah and Texas. It plans to build its gigabit network in North Carolina in the future. 

Sources: WRAL, Triangle Business Journal



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

4k uncompressed video?
By HoosierEngineer5 on 3/12/2014 6:59:38 PM , Rating: 2
If I calculate correctly, 3840 x 2160 x 10 bits per color x 3 colors x 60 frames per second comes out to 14,929,920,000 bits per second. That's roughly 15 gigabits per second.




RE: 4k uncompressed video?
By StevoLincolnite on 3/13/2014 3:40:54 AM , Rating: 2
Video streams are usually around 24 frames per second (fps).
Thus making it roughly 6 Gigabits per second.
Blu-ray specifically uses 8bit per colour.

Thus... You're looking at something like 4.8 Gigabits per second for an un-compressed 4k stream.

If you used a *really* good encoder/decoder, that didn't impact on quality, you can get it much much lower than that.


RE: 4k uncompressed video?
By HoosierEngineer5 on 3/13/2014 9:55:33 AM , Rating: 2
Yeah, can't figure out why the are distributing uncompressed video. Doesn't make sense to me.


"A lot of people pay zero for the cellphone ... That's what it's worth." -- Apple Chief Operating Officer Timothy Cook














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki