backtop


Print 36 comment(s) - last by blackseed.. on Mar 14 at 10:23 AM

Nudity is still allowed as long as it's artistic, educational or a documentary

Keep those sexy videos to yourself, because Twitter has made porn a no-no on Vine. 

According to the Vine blog, Twitter -- which owns the social video service Vine -- has changed its rules and terms of service this week, including a ban on sexually-explicit videos. 

The rules state that videos of sex acts (whether they're alone, with other people or with objects) are forbidden. That includes sexually explicit animations. 

However, nudity is still allowed as long as it's artistic, educational or a documentary. Even sexually suggestive content is welcome, but only if it's clothed. 
 
Twitter will rely on Vine users to report sexually explicit content rather than policing the site. Those who are flagged for sexual content can have their accounts suspended until the content is removed. 

But Twitter is already contacting Vine users with existing sexual content, which was posted before the rules changed. The company is seeking mass removal of any pornographic content, or users have the option to move their sexy videos to a new tool created by Twitter. This tool is only available to users to posted porn before the change in rules. 

Vine is a video-sharing service that allows Twitter and Vine users to share short video clips with one another. The minimum age for using Vine, according to Twitter, is 17 years old. 

Source: Vine



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Sigh...
By Mint on 3/7/2014 3:22:54 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
If you don't think pornography is acceptable for children than you should feel the same about violence.

I don't see why that's necessarily the case. Why should one be equivalent to the other? Or worse than the other?

They're two different subjects. There's no reason why you should tell me how I feel about them.


RE: Sigh...
By rs2 on 3/10/2014 8:56:58 PM , Rating: 2
It's still a valid point. Sex, when done properly, is natural, healthy, legal, and mutually enjoyable. And major religions aside, there's no secular basis for arguing that sex is somehow inherently immoral.

Violence (and particularly violence of the excessive/over the top variety often depicted in fiction), on the other hand, is none of those things.

So if one truly believes that exposure to sex is somehow so extremely damaging to young adults that it must be suppressed from all publicly accessible media, it logically follows that one should be at least as concerned about exposure to violence.

And if a person is not, it's an indication that they are not approaching the issue in a rational and logical manner, and should simply be ignored for acting childish and/or being beholden to a faith-based viewpoint that has no basis in reality.


"When an individual makes a copy of a song for himself, I suppose we can say he stole a song." -- Sony BMG attorney Jennifer Pariser











botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki