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Once all costs are figured in Davis says the bomber will cost more than the target per unit

When we reported on the U.S. Air Force’s plans for a next generation long-range bomber priced at $550 million a pop, our commenters were quick to point out that there was no way that figure could be accurate. Military procurement programs have the tendency to spiral out of control with regards to costs, as witnessed by the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II.
 
The USAF's top acquisition officer, Lt. Gen. Charles Davis, agrees and says that costs for the bomber will definitely be higher than the quoted figure.
 
Davis said, “Is it going to be $550 million a copy? No, of course it’s not going to be $550 million a copy once you add in everything.”
 
Davis also noted that the military would try to stick as close to that budget of $550 million each as possible. One of the ways the USAF will try and keep to that budget is by preventing extra requirements and untested tech from being included in the platform.


Lt. Gen. Charles R. Davis, Military Deputy, Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition
 
And unlike the troubled F-35 program, the winning design team – Northrop Grumman or Lockheed Martin/Boeing – for the next generation bomber will only have to satisfy the needs of the USAF. The F-35 has to appease – and adjust to changing operational requirements from – the USAF, U.S. Navy, U.S. Marines and the numerous ally nations that have bought into the program.
 
The bomber program also got a significant boost in funding in the FY2015 budget when the funds for research, development, testing, and evaluation were bumped from $379 million to $914 million.
 
The USAF plans to purchase 80 to 100 of the new bombers. 

Source: Defense News



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RE: Divide by 5, Multiply by 6...
By inperfectdarkness on 3/7/2014 6:18:25 AM , Rating: 2
Leave it to civilians to prepare to fight the last war. CIVILLIANS wanted to gut the military after WWII, only to have Korea b***h-slap us with a harsh dose of reality. The same thing happened with Operation Eagle Claw after Vietnam.

If our military only prepared to face the threats which it faced previously, it would be as unprepared for a full-scale symmetric war as it was for the asymmetric war that started on 9-11.

Full-scale, full-range capability is what we need. If we start putting provisos on that...we'll soon end up on the losing side of aggression.


By Jeffk464 on 3/7/2014 5:32:15 PM , Rating: 2
Hopefully you have military leadership that is flexible in its thinking and can adapt to change or better yet drive change. That's one of the big dangers of promoting bureaucrats and politician types to the higher ranks.


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