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Steve Ballmer
Former CEO Steve Ballmer threw a fit until he got his acquisition

Microsoft and Nokia have had a close relationship over the years, where Microsoft provided the Windows Phone software and Nokia made the hardware. But when former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer wanted his company to become a hardware maker, many top executives disagreed with such a move -- including current CEO Satya Nadella
 
According to Bloomberg, Ballmer was set on getting his way when it came to the acquisition of Nokia's Devices and Services division last year, despite opposition from top-ranking execs in the company. Ballmer reportedly threw a fit that everyone could hear last year when he learned of their opposition. 
 
Microsoft co-founder and current Technology Advisor Bill Gates along with Nadella and former Skype CEO in charge of Microsoft's business development Tony Bates all initially opposed Microsoft's move into hardware, as well as the idea of an expensive Nokia acquisition.
 
The board didn't back Ballmer's plan to acquire two Nokia units at the time, but after Ballmer's hissy fit in June 2013, the board signed off on a $7.2 billion USD purchase of Nokia’s mobile phone business. Nadella had also reportedly changed his mind about the Nokia acquisition, saying it was a good idea after all.
 
“Nokia brings mobile-first depth across hardware, software, design, global supply chain expertise and deep understanding and connections across the mobile market,” said Nadella. “This is the right move for Microsoft.”

Bates, on the other hand, remained strongly opposed. Earlier this week, it was announced that he is leaving the company immediately, which could be a result of being passed up for CEO earlier this year. There could also be internal frustrations with his opposition of Microsoft's move toward hardware. 
 
But Microsoft team members had a right to worry about the company's future in hardware, as the past has been quite telling. For instance, Microsoft's first homemade tablet called Surface was largely a flop at launch in October 2012. Windows RT was seen as a half-baked Windows product that didn't run legacy apps, and the Windows 8 Pro version was much too expensive for the typical consumer, and Windows 8 in general created a storm among users who just wanted their Start button back and the live tiles on their desktops to go away. 
 
In July 2013, Microsoft reported the largest earnings miss in at least a decade and took an unexpected $900 million charge due to the Surface flop. 
 
Ballmer announced that he would be retiring as Microsoft's CEO within a year last August, and Nadella was named CEO in January. 
 
Nadella is currently shaking up the executive ranks and unraveling certain parts of Ballmer's restructuring process.

Source: Bloomberg



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RE: funny
By Argon18 on 3/5/2014 3:48:27 PM , Rating: 2
"and claimed Linux didn't suffer from the 3.2GiB memory limit that affected all 32-bit operating systems."

Here you go dunce amanojaku, for the whole DT world to see your stupidity on 4 GB RAM limitation in the crippled garbage OS from Redmond:

"Microsoft limits 32-bit Workstation (client) versions of Windows to 4 GB as a matter of its licensing policy."

"The Linux kernel includes full PAE mode support starting with version 2.3.23"

FYI, kernel 2.3.23 was released in 1999, about the same time that PAE enabled hardware first became available, and well before any consumer hardware supported more than 4 GB of RAM anyhow.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_Address_Extension


RE: funny
By themaster08 on 3/5/2014 4:06:40 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Microsoft limits 32-bit Workstation (client) versions of Windows to 4 GB as a matter of its licensing policy
Why are you arguing over a technicality where the amount of people affected is virtually non-existent? PAE is nothing more than delaying the inevitable, of which has already occurred. Many servers now run with 64GB of RAM and above. The vast majority of new workstations run 64-bit operating systems.

Furthermore, this only affected client OSs. Windows server fully supports PAE.


RE: funny
By Argon18 on 3/5/2014 4:11:09 PM , Rating: 2
"Why are you arguing over a technicality where the amount of people affected is virtually non-existent? PAE is nothing more than delaying the inevitable, of which has already occurred. "

I dunno, ask amanojaku, he brought it up. My post was a reply to him. I was only pointing out how ignorant he is on the subject.


RE: funny
By amanojaku on 3/5/2014 4:26:34 PM , Rating: 2
Once again, you show YOUR ignorance.

The 3.2GiB limit was not an OS limitation. It was a BIOS and chipset limitation. All devices have a memory addresses allocated by the BIOS. Since the BIOS and and the chipset used 32-bit memory addresses, this meant that device addresses came from the 32-bit address space. Consequently, a computer with 4GiB of RAM had holes. To get around this, you needed a BIOS/chipset combination that could address more than 32-bits. This was unusual and expensive in the desktop space, but common in servers. Since Linux predominantly ran on servers, the kernel was adjusted to support PAE.

Windows was also modified to support PAE, however, only for servers. The reason was legacy driver support. Since it was uncommon for desktops to have 4GiB or greater, and very common for desktops to have legacy drivers, it made sense not to modify desktop Windows and break compatibility. Especially since a lot of legacy drivers came from companies that either ceased updates, or went out of business.

http://linux.livejournal.com/1754389.html?nojs=1
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-gene...
http://blogs.technet.com/b/markrussinovich/archive...


RE: funny
By Argon18 on 3/5/2014 4:47:53 PM , Rating: 2
Huh? This isn't at all what you claimed. Here you go, these are YOUR words:

"and claimed Linux didn't suffer from the 3.2GiB memory limit that affected all 32-bit operating systems."

So is it an OS limitation or not? You claim that it is, then you claim that it isn't? Huh? You seem so confused amanojaku, you can go back to sleep now.


RE: funny
By Argon18 on 3/5/2014 4:58:05 PM , Rating: 2
"Since Linux predominantly ran on servers, the kernel was adjusted to support PAE."

What a bizarre statement to make. The same Linux kernel that runs an email server is also running your Android phone, and also running the most powerful supercomputers on earth. It's the same kernel, same code.

If someone came out with a super smartphone right now today that had 64 CPU cores a 1 Terabyte of RAM and a 4k display, Linux and Android would work on it perfectly. Right now today. No modifications required. Nobody else can make that claim. Certainly not Microsoft with their dinky Windoze Mobile and RT tinker toys.


RE: funny
By inighthawki on 3/5/2014 5:50:49 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
If someone came out with a super smartphone right now today that had 64 CPU cores a 1 Terabyte of RAM and a 4k display, Linux and Android would work on it perfectly. Right now today. No modifications required. Nobody else can make that claim. Certainly not Microsoft with their dinky Windoze Mobile and RT tinker toys.


Windows supports all of those things out of the box.


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