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German newspaper Bild am Sonntag said that the NSA is currently spying on about 320 politicians and business leaders in Germany

U.S. President Barack Obama stopped the National Security Agency's (NSA) spying on Chancellor Angela Merkel, but a German newspaper claims that the NSA is still keeping a close watch on top German government officials. 
 
According to Reuters, German newspaper Bild am Sonntag said that the NSA is currently spying on about 320 politicians and business leaders in Germany, including Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere, a close confidant of Merkel.
 
Bild am Sonntag said its information came from a high-ranking NSA employee in Germany, who chose to remain anonymous. 
 
"We have had the order not to miss out on any information now that we are no longer able to monitor the chancellor's communication directly," said the NSA employee, according to Bild am Sonntag.


Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Obama [SOURCE: Truth Frequency Radio]

Berlin has been looking to make a "no-spy" deal with Washington, and German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier is due to visit the U.S. on Thursday for that purpose. 

In October 2013, German magazine Der Spiegel reported that the U.S. had tapped Chancellor Merkel phone for years, and spied on 34 other world leaders as well. This led one German politician to call for a complete halt on trade negotiations between the European Union and the U.S.

But Obama attempted to calm the situation in January when he ordered the NSA to stop spying on the leaders of U.S.-allied nations.

Sources: Reuters, The Hill



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Power requires knowledge and responsibility
By ptmmac on 2/24/2014 5:03:19 PM , Rating: 1
Spying on friends and enemies a like is not a bad thing. It is an absolutely necessary practice.

We are talking about ruling a world with nuclear weapons, terrorists and modern technology aren't we? Can you imagine Elizabeth I ruling without spy's? No great ruler ever protected his country and built better alliances without spying. Who are you kidding? This is not some game. People's lives depend on this knowledge. Would you want to go into Germany as the General running Nato and have your boss tell you the political intel you are getting is going to be limited because some idiots thought that we shouldn't spy on our friends?!!

Have you noticed how much the Russians are spying on us? That little tirade the American Ambassador threw did not become public knowledge by accident. How are you going to know if they are your friends if you don't spy?

We are currently dancing on a possible war over the Ukraine and you don't want the President to know who his supporters are in European Union? What kind of drugs are you guys on?




RE: Power requires knowledge and responsibility
By ritualm on 2/24/2014 5:53:54 PM , Rating: 3
The post above vividly illustrates why USA is not worthy of trust, even from its staunchest "allies".

All of that spying against everyone in the world... to protect whom? Certainly not you and me.


RE: Power requires knowledge and responsibility
By Reclaimer77 on 2/24/2014 6:03:34 PM , Rating: 2
The NSA has always spied, and the world has always known. Why are you acting like something new happened here? And the world also spies on everyone else. Every first world country spies on every other one, fact.

The NSA crossed the line, however, when they started spying on US citizens.

And yeah call it a double standard, play the moral relativism card, I don't care. I'm fine with the NSA doing it's job against other countries. But ONLY against other countries.


RE: Power requires knowledge and responsibility
By ritualm on 2/24/2014 6:23:10 PM , Rating: 3
NSA already crossed that line YEARS ago. Spying on foreigners is just a pretext to spy on US citizens. Secret router rooms at AT&T, anyone?


By Solandri on 2/26/2014 5:30:29 AM , Rating: 2
Never forget - this wasn't some rogue NSA operation. NSA was instructed to and given the power to do these things by the proud members of the House, Senate, and White House.

The NSA didn't cross the line. The politicians moved it so they could do these things without crossing any lines.


By JediJeb on 2/25/2014 6:27:48 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The post above vividly illustrates why USA is not worthy of trust, even from its staunchest "allies". All of that spying against everyone in the world... to protect whom? Certainly not you and me.


It would be nice to live in a world where every government could trust ever other government to the point that every single statement they made what the clear and honest truth and that there were no state secrets whatsoever that were hidden from any single person in the world. But since it is possible that ANY government can say something to another that is not totally true, how is a government to know for sure what is true and what is not?

Something totally off the wall but a good example. What if some country like oh maybe France discovers a deposit of five million tons of gold and tells nobody about it. Would it be a good idea for other countries to find out about it so they could prepare in case France decided to just dump it on the open market and crash the value of gold? Or would it be better for the world to be perfectly civil and never spy on anyone and then be decimated by the actions of a few people in France? I know that scenario is totally off the wall, but how would you like to be a world leader and have to explain to your citizens why their entire savings and your economy was now in shambles and you did not even have a hint that it was about to happen?

I do believe that our Constitution here in the US gives its citizens the right to privacy and clearly states that it should not spy on its citizens without a warrant. It also does give the government the right to spy on a citizen for which it has probable cause to believe there is a crime about to be committed, but it has to take the steps to go through the court system to obtain the warrant to do so. These rules protect both the citizen and the government. The US Constitution also charges the government with the responsibility to protect its citizens, and if that means it has to gather intelligence on other nations to secure our safety then that is what it has to do. There is however a difference in keeping an eye on other countries and recording ever single thing the leader of another country says to their children and friends. I don't have a problem if the US wants to know what Germany is saying to France, or if Germany wants to know what the US is saying to Russia, that has been part of the game of governing for as long as there have been governments. But to look into the personal lives of leaders or citizens serves no purpose for national security it only serves as a way to attack or weaken that person if some dark secret if discovered. Spying is a necessary evil, but it should have a clearly defined purpose pertaining to protecting a nation, not for the furtherance of personal vendettas or gain.


By StevoLincolnite on 2/24/2014 6:18:44 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Spying on friends and enemies a like is not a bad thing. It is an absolutely necessary practice.


No it's not.
I live in Australia, I have a right to my privacy.

So instead of spying on us (I don't doubt that you are.)
Hows about just asking us for the information? We already share military intelligence because of our strong military ties, we are tightly woven economically, we have the same ideals and similar history.

Not every country is as paranoid as the US government.

With that in mind, our own country was caught spying out of embassy's, the government was ridiculed for it and deservedly so, spying on allies is wrong.
Instead use diplomacy to get what you want, the USA has an edge in that regard as that have more pushing power.


RE: Power requires knowledge and responsibility
By KCjoker on 2/24/2014 6:25:07 PM , Rating: 2
Wait, you don't think Australia spies on the USA and lots of other countries? lol


By Reclaimer77 on 2/24/2014 6:32:13 PM , Rating: 2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_Secret_Int...

Took five seconds to find. You would think someone who LIVES in Australia....


By brasstax on 2/25/2014 5:00:41 PM , Rating: 2
Who protects your right to privacy? I certainly don't. Do you protect mine? I'd wager not.

There is no love in politics. There is no trust and very rarely is there truth. We are all adulterers. So if you ask us to reaffirm our faithfulness, you'll believe us, right?

As for Australia, I'm glad our national interests generally coincide. I hope that continues to be the case. But if and when it doesn't, I hope to know about it before you decide to tell me.

Next time, NSA, just don't get caught.


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